Pittsburgh residents get ready for driverless Uber cars

Pittsburgh residents get ready for driverless Uber cars

Brian FungThe Washington Post

Very soon, residents of this hilly city will become the first Americans to test out Uber‘s self-driving car service.

It is a historic moment not just for the ride-hailing company, but also for robotic cars in general. For many people, the technology will finally become a reality, one they can touch and experience rather than just read about.

Uber has been conducting its driverless-car tests on open roads since May. People in Pittsburgh say they have often seen the company’s prototypes driving around the city, their rooftops laden with sensors and communications equipment. But the project otherwise has been shrouded in secrecy, even from the drivers who sometimes ferry Uber employees to work in the Strip District.

Hence, what Pittsburgh locals think about Uber’s driverless cars has been shaped mostly by what they have observed with their own eyes. And their reactions run the gamut, from hope that the new technology will contribute to their city’s story of renewal, to questions about the cars’ performance on Pittsburgh’s complicated road network, to concerns about how the vehicles will affect the overall economy.

uber-referral-code5Most of all, interviews with city residents reveal a reluctance to trust a technology that Uber has kept so close to the chest.

“It’s scary, being driven by a robot,” Ada Gana said. “A person who’s driving knows what he’s doing or where he’s going. That gives me confidence.”

The San Francisco company staffs each of its driverless cars with two full-time employees, one to grasp the wheel and another to keep an eye on the computer software. That will not change when the company debuts its driverless service. But not everyone knows that. Some believed the cars would be empty, which suggests Uber has a lot of educating to do.

That is particularly the case for seniors, said Eva Tsuquiashi-Daddesio, 67. “If Uber or other companies want to be successful with the older population, they need to do a lot of demonstrations. Talk is not going to do anything,” she said. Seniors “have to see other people like them — like us, I suppose — using it, and they will have to see that it is safe.”

Even some younger people say they would be hesitant to try a self-driving Uber, although some predict that university students here will be among the most eager adopters.

For Uber drivers, however, it is no surprise that employment is the bigger concern.

Michelle Garrison has four children and treats driving for Uber as a full-time job. She wakes up at 5:15 a.m., Monday through Friday, and does not stop picking up passengers until 6 in the evening.

“I personally don’t care for it,” she said of the testing of self-driving cars. “I think it’s going to take jobs away from some of us. It’s going to take away from the actual drivers that are out here that are putting in the time and the hours.”

Uber’s chief executive, Travis Kalanick, has said that he does not expect the number of human drivers to decline anytime soon and that self-driving technology will create jobs, such as for fleet maintenance.

That is not enough to alleviate some Uber drivers’ worries. A few have signed on with a group called Cabbie Central, a Pittsburgh organization that represents nearly 250 people who drive for taxi and, increasingly, ride-hailing services. Although they compete intensely for the same customers, taxi drivers and Uber drivers are discovering they have much in common in the face of Uber’s automation experiments, said Jim Jacobs, the general manager of Cabbie Central and a taxi driver who has been in the business for 11 years.

Uber’s aggressive timetable in launching an autonomous service has led many of its drivers to grapple with an uncomfortable reality much sooner than expected, said Jacobs: This is what planned obsolescence really looks like.

Some who view their gig with Uber as a part-time or temporary job are not as worried. “It hasn’t affected me yet, and I’m not career-sold on doing this forever,” said Jason Renton, a driver who lives half an hour from downtown Pittsburgh. “So no, it doesn’t really bother me.”

He and other drivers say that 70% to 95% of their customers are skeptical of the technology.

There are still a lot of questions. Some residents worry about the ability of a self-driving car to successfully navigate to a rider’s location or to avoid sudden road closures. Pittsburgh is said to be a tough — as in “good” — test case for self-driving vehicles because the city has hills, bridges and older streets.

On Sept. 2, a construction accident on the Liberty Bridge caused a fire so hot, it melted part of the bridge’s support structure. The bridge has been closed for weeks, causing commuter headaches. But Uber’s navigation system did not appear to know about the closure, said Shiquita Crumbley, a Pittsburgh native who started driving for Uber a few months ago.

“GPSes are not always correct,” she said. “It might take you to this bridge, not necessarily knowing, hey, this bridge is not open, you can’t go on it. So just making sure it’s the most updated version — that’s going to be the biggest, biggest thing for everyone’s safety.”

For the foreseeable future, navigation may not be a big issue for the self-driving cars, as the Uber employee behind the wheel can always take over.

Local transportation activists say they support Uber’s effort. “People are bad at driving,” said Scott Bricker, executive director of the bicycling advocacy group Bike Pittsburgh. “Recently, a Pittsburgh bicyclist posted video of a self-driving Uber test car giving him space and passing at a slower speed in contrast to a car driven by a person…. If you ask me, taking the human factor out of driving can’t happen fast enough.”

Other local residents say the program helps put Pittsburgh on the map. In recent years, an influx of new money has brought tremendous growth for the former industrial powerhouse, reversing decades of decline.

“A lot of people have regional pride in the universities, big companies like Uber and Google being here,” said Hassan Khan, a doctoral student at Carnegie Mellon University. Uber’s self-driving program, he said, “fits that narrative of Pittsburgh being a resurgent city through tech, through medicine.”

Livermore Police & 7 officers criminally charged in Bay Area police sex scandal, D.A. says

7 officers to be criminally charged in Bay Area police sex scandal, D.A. says

James Queally and Cindy Chang

Seven Bay Area law enforcement officers will be charged with sex offenses and other crimes in a scandal that has rocked the Oakland Police Department, threatening its hopes of ending 13 years of federal oversight and causing a major shake-up in its command staff.

The plan to charge the officers was announced Friday by Alameda County Dist. Atty. Nancy E. O’Malley, who said she could not file the charges until the teenage woman at the center of the scandal returns to California after being sent to a rehabilitation program in Florida by another agency.

“Anyone, particularly in a position of authority, who engages in sexual exploitation or inappropriate sexual conduct with a minor or a young adult will be held accountable if we have the evidence,” O’Malley said. “It doesn’t matter if they’re a police officer, a doctor, a probation officer, or a lawyer or a judge.”

Two law enforcement officers — Giovani LoVerde of the Oakland Police Department and Ricardo Perez, who has resigned from the Contra Costa County Sheriff’s Department — will be charged with felony oral copulation with a minor, O’Malley said. Perez will also be charged with two counts of engaging in a lewd act.

Four other Oakland police officers will be prosecuted: Brian Bunton, on charges of felony obstruction of justice and engaging in an act of prostitution; Warit Utappa and Tyrell Smith, who allegedly searched a criminal justice computer system without an authorized purpose; and LeRoy Johnson, on charges of failing to report sexual misconduct against a minor.

Johnson has retired and Smith has resigned from the department.

Dan Black, who has retired from the Livermore Police Department, will be charged with two counts of engaging in an act of prostitution and two counts of a lewd act in a public place.

The alleged sexual offenses do not appear to have occurred while the officers were on duty, O’Malley said.

The officers could not immediately be reached for comment.

Earlier this year, Contra Costa County prosecutors declined to charge Smith after he had been accused of attempting to forcibly sodomize the woman. O’Malley said she believes Smith and Utappa had sexual contact with the woman in Contra Costa County, but her office has no jurisdiction outside of Alameda County.

In a television news interview in June, the 19-year-old Richmond woman claimed she had sex with more than a dozen Oakland police officers. Some of the encounters happened in exchange for information about planned prostitution raids, the woman has alleged, and others occurred when she was underage.

The scandal soon widened, as the woman claimed she also had had sex or other inappropriate contact with officers from other police agencies.

The woman’s name has been widely reported, but the Los Angeles Times has not published her identity because she may be a sex crime victim.

Some officers who engaged in “sexting” with the woman cannot be prosecuted because the victim was not underage, said O’Malley, who characterized the online activity as “sexually explicit or inappropriate chatter.”

O’Malley said that many police officers who were “friends” with the woman on Facebook had never met her in person, including Oakland police Officer Brendan O’Brien, whose suicide in September 2015 caused the city’s internal affairs unit to begin digging into the scandal. The woman has said in numerous interviews that she met O’Brien along International Boulevard when he saved her from an attack by a boyfriend or pimp.

O’Malley repeatedly stressed that those linked to the scandal did not represent the larger Oakland Police Department.

The actions of a few have really shone a very negative light on all of the hardworking men and women who come to work every day as police officers to protect our community,” O’Malley said.

Barry Donelan, president of the Oakland Police Officers’ Assn., also emphasized that the vast majority of his colleagues were not involved in the scandal.

“Our officers are just as disappointed as everyone else in the blemish these events have made on the reputations of Oakland police officers who come to work every day and serve with honor in our community,” Donelan said in a written statement.

The decision to file charges was made public days after Oakland’s mayor announced that the city would fire four officers and suspend seven others without pay in connection with the scandal.

Local activists said O’Malley’s decision to prosecute might lead other victims of police misconduct to step forward and help flush bad officers out of the agency.

O’Malley showed “real leadership” in choosing to prosecute, but every officer implicated in the scandal should be forced out of the department, said Kenyatta Carter, a 37-year-old Oakland native and activist who founded Victims Of The System, a group that helps people bring grievances against state and city agencies.

“These officers should not be allowed to remain suspended and come back,” Carter said. “Training is not enough if you knew about what was going on with a minor, or sexting.… That’s unacceptable. Period.”

Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf said Friday that she hoped the announcement of the charges would make clear that city officials are committed to eliminating a small group of officers who committed “disgusting misconduct.” Asked about calls to fire, rather than simply suspend, some of the officers connected to the scandal, Schaaf said the city attorney’s office and Oakland police internal affairs investigators were hamstrung by when and where some of the alleged misdeeds occurred.

“This case is complicated because most of the misconduct occurred off-duty,” she said in a telephone interview. “Not all of it — certainly, the improper use of databases was done on duty — but that should be taken into consideration.”

She said she could not comment on LoVerde’s, Bunton’s or Utappa’s status with the city police department.

O’Malley said her office had uncovered evidence of additional misconduct in several other jurisdictions, including the city of San Francisco, as well as San Joaquin and Contra Costa counties. On Thursday, Contra Costa County Chief Dist. Atty.  Doug McMaster told The Times that his office had not been presented with any prosecutable cases in connection with the scandal.

McMaster previously told The Times that the woman at the center of the case was sent to Florida with funds from a state victims’ advocacy program. He scoffed at the idea that she was “spirited away” to keep her from testifying. Calls to McMaster seeking additional comment Friday were not immediately returned.

On Aug. 29, the woman was arrested and charged with aggravated battery in Florida after she bit a security guard at the rehabilitation facility in Stuart, Fla., according to an arrest report filed by the Martin County Sheriff’s Office.

Police were called to the facility after the woman became physically combative with several staff members. In interviews with sheriff’s deputies, she repeatedly discussed her past drug abuse and sexual encounters with police officers and later attempted to solicit sex from the deputies, according to the report.

An attorney representing the woman could not be reached for comment.

John Burris, the civil rights attorney who negotiated a legal settlement that placed Oakland under a federal monitor in 2003, said the woman’s arrest in Florida, coupled with O’Malley’s investigation poking holes in some of her narrative, could allow the officers’ attorneys to attack her credibility at trial.

The sex scandal grew in scope after Oakland Police Chief Sean Whent, who had been credited with bringing the department out of the shadow of the 2003 brutality scandal that led to the implementation of a federal monitor, resigned the same weekend the woman’s TV news interview aired.

Whent’s successor stepped down within days, as did the next police chief. The department is now run by a civilian city administrator.

Schaaf, the city’s mayor, said she will focus her attention on helping heal the widening rift between police and citizens, adding that she remained hopeful Oakland could attract a progressive, reform-minded candidate to fill the vacant chief’s post.

“No doubt this scandal has shaken not just community trust, but the forward momentum that this department was feeling,” Schaaf said. “But I have every confidence that we will move forward.”

Ann Steinfeld Physical Therapy CHAMPIONS AlternativeS TO COMBAT Rising OpioiD EPIDEMIC

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Edan Devora

info@annsteinfeldpt.com

(714) 556-2600

 

Ann Steinfeld Physical Therapy CHAMPIONS

AlternativeS TO COMBAT Rising OpioiD EPIDEMIC

Leading Orange County Physical Therapy Clinic Promotes Holistic Approach to Pain Management

 

(Headline News Guru Original Story by Jules Hermes – Permission to repost within journalism ethics and standards) COSTA MESA, CA — June 2, 2016 – With the alleged prescription drug-related death of Prince, the U.S. is once again forced to examine the staggering statistics that indicate a country in crisis. No longer confined to one particular stereotype, prescription and illicit drug abuse has infiltrated every socioeconomic class, affecting every race and age group, from young adults to senior citizens. To help spread the message that conservative, non drug approaches can effectively manage pain, Ann Steinfeld Physical Therapy – a leading Orange County, Calif. physical therapy practice specializing in sports medicine, orthopedics, geriatrics and neurology – has joined others in the federal, state, local and private sectors to address the prescription drug abuse and heroin epidemic. Advocating for a multidisciplinary clinical approach—including physical therapists serving on the care team alongside physicians and other healthcare providers—Ann Steinfeld, the clinic’s founder and CEO, is among a consortium of therapists committed to holistically improving the quality of life for patients with acute and chronic pain.

“There is no doubt that physical therapy as a first-line treatment for chronic pain can be as effective as—and safer than—prescription drug therapy,” say Steinfeld who founded her practice in Costa Mesa in 2001. “In response to the alarming rate of opioid abuse, the recently released Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for prescribing opioids delivers a clear message that echoes what we physical therapists have known for decades: there are better, safer ways to treat chronic pain than the use of opioids.”

The American Academy of Pain Medicine reports that 100 million Americans suffer from chronic pain, exceeding diabetes, heart disease and cancer conditions combined. According to the CDC, physicians wrote 259 million opioid prescriptions in 2012, which translates to one bottle of pills per American adult. An individualized physical therapy plan, however, aims to reduce a patient’s pain and associated disability, improve function, and promote health and well being without the use of drugs. Through a comprehensive evaluation, physical therapists can address chronic pain with a combination of movement exercises, manual therapy, and education about pain science, body alignment and movement, all of which contribute to understanding the underlying cause of pain.

Ann Steinfeld Physical Therapy has made great strides in the advancement of techniques that go beyond rehabilitating athletes and assisting those who have undergone surgery or sustained injuries from an accident. With the capacity to incorporate hands-on manual therapy methods with state-of-the-art equipment, as well as massage therapy, patients of all ages and walks of life not only experience remarkable results but also develop strategies to manage their own long-term health goals. Through individualized comprehensive plans executed by some of Orange County’s top therapists who provide the highest caliber of care and focused attention to patient concerns, Ann Steinfeld expedites the healing process with cost-effective and drug-free alternatives to alleviate pain, and imparts long-lasting preventive solutions to ensure optimal health for the present and well into the future.

Addiction to opioids is not a new phenomenon, but it has escalated to new proportions. The number of Americans dying each year from drug overdoses has surpassed that of motor vehicle crashes. More than half of patients prescribed opioids for chronic pain continue to take the painkillers five years later, according to a 2011 study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. In fact, a staggering four in five new heroin users started out misusing prescription painkillers, according to a National Center for Health Statistics Data Brief. A key initiative of the APTA and 40 provider groups over the next two years is a collective messaging campaign to reach more than 4 million healthcare providers regarding opioid abuse and appropriate prescribing practices.

 

For media-related questions, contact Edan Devora, info@annsteinfeldpt.com or call (714) 556-2600.

For more information regarding Ann Steinfeld Physical Therapy, visit: http://www.annsteinfeldpt.com.

 

ABOUT ANN STEINFELD PHYSICAL THERAPY

Ann SteinfeldAnn Steinfeld Physical Therapy is a privately owned outpatient practice in Orange County, Calif. specializing in the evaluation and treatment of physical injuries and disabilities resulting from a wide range of conditions related to sports and athletics, surgical procedures, occupation, repetitive motion and accidents, as well as those specific to age and gender. Ann Steinfeld’s highly skilled and trained, licensed physical therapists utilize a broad spectrum of the most advanced physical intervention and rehabilitation techniques to alleviate pain, restore mobility, improve balance and coordination, and increase muscular strength and endurance. Referred to by leading physicians throughout Los Angeles and Orange County, Ann Steinfeld provides a comprehensive team approach to ensure successful patient outcomes, while maintaining the highest quality of exceptional one-to-one care in an energetic, positive and ethical environment. For more information visit: www.annsteinfeldpt.com.

 About The Private Practice Section of the American Physical Therapy Association

Founded in 1956, the Private Practice Section of the American Physical Therapy Association champions the success of physical therapist-owned businesses. Our members are leaders and innovators in the health care system. The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) represents more than 85,000 physical therapists, physical therapist assistants and students of physical therapy nationwide. For more information, please visit http://www.ppsapta.org.

 

Author
Jules Hermes
Hermes House Press – A featured Partner of Headline News Guru

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/rr/rr6501e1.htm

Trump reaches critical number to clinch nomination

May 26 at 1:17 PM
WASHINGTON — Donald Trump reached the number of delegates needed to clinch the Republican nomination for president Thursday, completing an unlikely rise that has upended the political landscape and set the stage for a bitter fall campaign.The good news for Trump, reported by The Associated Press after a nationwide survey of unbound delegates, was tempered by continuing problems for his campaign. Those include the abrupt departure of Trump’s political director and continuing resistance by many Republican leaders to declare their support for his upstart candidacy.Trump was put over the top in the AP delegate count by a small number of the party’s unbound delegates who told the AP they would support him at the national convention in July. Among them was Oklahoma GOP chairwoman Pam Pollard.

“I think he has touched a part of our electorate that doesn’t like where our country is,” Pollard said. “I have no problem supporting Mr. Trump.”

It takes 1,237 delegates to win the Republican nomination. Trump has reached 1,238. With 303 delegates at stake in five state primaries on June 7, Trump will easily pad his total, avoiding a contested convention in Cleveland.

Speaker Paul Ryan has backed away from his pledge to support whoever becomes the nominee, saying he’s “not ready” to endorse Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. Other GOP heavyweights, including the Bushes, are also not giving endorsements. (Jenny Starrs/The Washington Post)

Trump, a political neophyte who for years delivered caustic commentary on the state of the nation from the sidelines but had never run for office, fought off 16 other Republican contenders in an often ugly primary race.

Many on the right have been slow to warm to Trump, wary of his conservative bona fides. Others worry about his crass personality and the lewd comments he’s made about women.

But millions of grass-roots activists, many of them outsiders to the political process, have embraced him as a plain-speaking populist.

Steve House, chairman of the Colorado Republican Party and an unbound delegate who confirmed his support of Trump to the AP, said he likes the billionaire’s background as a businessman. “Leadership is leadership,” House said. “If he can surround himself with the political talent, I think he will be fine.”

May 26 at 1:17 PM
WASHINGTON — Donald Trump reached the number of delegates needed to clinch the Republican nomination for president Thursday, completing an unlikely rise that has upended the political landscape and set the stage for a bitter fall campaign.The good news for Trump, reported by The Associated Press after a nationwide survey of unbound delegates, was tempered by continuing problems for his campaign. Those include the abrupt departure of Trump’s political director and continuing resistance by many Republican leaders to declare their support for his upstart candidacy.Trump was put over the top in the AP delegate count by a small number of the party’s unbound delegates who told the AP they would support him at the national convention in July. Among them was Oklahoma GOP chairwoman Pam Pollard.

“I think he has touched a part of our electorate that doesn’t like where our country is,” Pollard said. “I have no problem supporting Mr. Trump.”

It takes 1,237 delegates to win the Republican nomination. Trump has reached 1,238. With 303 delegates at stake in five state primaries on June 7, Trump will easily pad his total, avoiding a contested convention in Cleveland.

GOP establishment splits over supporting Trump

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Play Video2:46
Speaker Paul Ryan has backed away from his pledge to support whoever becomes the nominee, saying he’s “not ready” to endorse Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. Other GOP heavyweights, including the Bushes, are also not giving endorsements. (Jenny Starrs/The Washington Post)

Trump, a political neophyte who for years delivered caustic commentary on the state of the nation from the sidelines but had never run for office, fought off 16 other Republican contenders in an often ugly primary race.

Many on the right have been slow to warm to Trump, wary of his conservative bona fides. Others worry about his crass personality and the lewd comments he’s made about women.

But millions of grass-roots activists, many of them outsiders to the political process, have embraced him as a plain-speaking populist.

Steve House, chairman of the Colorado Republican Party and an unbound delegate who confirmed his support of Trump to the AP, said he likes the billionaire’s background as a businessman.

“Leadership is leadership,” House said. “If he can surround himself with the political talent, I think he will be fine.”

Replay

 

Trump’s pivotal moment comes amid a new sign of internal problems.

Hours before clinching the nomination, he announced the abrupt departure of political director Rick Wiley, who was in the midst of leading the campaign’s push to hire staff in key battleground states. In a statement, Trump’s campaign said Wiley had been hired only until the candidate’s organization “was running full steam.”

Poll: Most voters see Trump and Clinton unfavorably

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Play Video1:33
Here’s what a Washington Post/ABC News poll conducted May 16-19, 2016 said about the race between Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton and GOP candidate Donald Trump. (Sarah Parnass/The Washington Post)

His hiring about six weeks ago was seen as a sign that party veterans were embracing Trump’s campaign. But a person familiar with Wiley’s ouster said the operative clashed with others in Trump’s operation and didn’t want to put longtime Trump allies in key jobs. The person insisted on anonymity because the person was not authorized to publicly discuss the internal campaign dynamics.

Some delegates who confirmed their decisions to back Trump were tepid at best.

Cameron Linton of Pittsburgh said he will back Trump on the first ballot since he won the presidential primary vote in Linton’s congressional district.

“If there’s a second ballot I won’t vote for Donald Trump,” Linton said. “He’s ridiculous. There’s no other way to say it.”

Trump’s path to the Republican presidential nomination began with an escalator ride.

Trump and his wife, Melania, descended an escalator into the basement lobby of the Trump Tower on June 16, 2015, for an announcement many observers had said would never come: The celebrity real estate developer had flirted with running for office in the past.

His speech then set the tone for his ability to dominate the headlines with provocative statements, insults and hyperbole. He called Mexicans “rapists,” promised to build a wall between the U.S. and Mexico and proposed banning most Muslims from the U.S. for an indeterminate time.

He criticized women for their looks. And he unleashed an uncanny marketing ability in which he deduced his critics’ weak points and distilled them to nicknames that stuck. “Little Marco” Rubio, “Weak” Jeb Bush and “Lyin’ Ted” Cruz, among others, all were forced into reacting to Trump. They fell one-by-one — leaving Trump the sole survivor of a riotous Republican primary.

CONTENT FROM SAMSUNGConnectivity for a smarter world

The Internet of Things (IoT) has the potential to solve our biggest global challenges and bring people everywhere a better quality of life.

 

His rallies became magnets for free publicity. Onstage, he dispensed populism that drew thousands of supporters, many wearing his trademark “Make America Great Again” hats and chanting, “Build the wall!”

The events drew protests too— with demonstrators sometimes forcibly ejected.

When voting started, Trump was not so fast out of the gate.

He lost the Iowa caucuses in February, falling behind Cruz and barely edging Rubio for second. He recovered in New Hampshire. From there he and Cruz fiercely engaged, with Trump winning some and losing some but one way or another dominating the rest of the primary season — in votes or at least in attention — and ultimately in delegates.

He incurred relatively low campaign costs — just $57 million through the end of April. He covered most of it with at least $43 million of his own money loaned to the campaign.

Trump entered a new phase of his campaign Tuesday night by holding his first major campaign fundraiser: a $25,000-per-ticket dinner in Los Angeles.

Trump, 69, the son of a New York City real estate magnate, had risen to fame in the 1980s and 1990s, overseeing major real estate deals, watching his financial fortunes rise, then fall, hosting “The Apprentice” TV show and authoring more than a dozen books.

___

Associated Press writers James Nord in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Marc Levy in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, James MacPherson in Bismarck, North Dakota, Jill Colvin in Anaheim, California, Steve Peoples in Washington and Sean Murphy in Oklahoma City contributed to this report.

Hours before clinching the nomination, he announced the abrupt departure of political director Rick Wiley, who was in the midst of leading the campaign’s push to hire staff in key battleground states. In a statement, Trump’s campaign said Wiley had been hired only until the candidate’s organization “was running full steam.”

Here’s what a Washington Post/ABC News poll conducted May 16-19, 2016 said about the race between Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton and GOP candidate Donald Trump. (Sarah Parnass/The Washington Post)

His hiring about six weeks ago was seen as a sign that party veterans were embracing Trump’s campaign. But a person familiar with Wiley’s ouster said the operative clashed with others in Trump’s operation and didn’t want to put longtime Trump allies in key jobs. The person insisted on anonymity because the person was not authorized to publicly discuss the internal campaign dynamics.

Some delegates who confirmed their decisions to back Trump were tepid at best.

Cameron Linton of Pittsburgh said he will back Trump on the first ballot since he won the presidential primary vote in Linton’s congressional district.

“If there’s a second ballot I won’t vote for Donald Trump,” Linton said. “He’s ridiculous. There’s no other way to say it.”

Trump’s path to the Republican presidential nomination began with an escalator ride.

Trump and his wife, Melania, descended an escalator into the basement lobby of the Trump Tower on June 16, 2015, for an announcement many observers had said would never come: The celebrity real estate developer had flirted with running for office in the past.

His speech then set the tone for his ability to dominate the headlines with provocative statements, insults and hyperbole. He called Mexicans “rapists,” promised to build a wall between the U.S. and Mexico and proposed banning most Muslims from the U.S. for an indeterminate time.

He criticized women for their looks. And he unleashed an uncanny marketing ability in which he deduced his critics’ weak points and distilled them to nicknames that stuck. “Little Marco” Rubio, “Weak” Jeb Bush and “Lyin’ Ted” Cruz, among others, all were forced into reacting to Trump. They fell one-by-one — leaving Trump the sole survivor of a riotous Republican primary.

The Internet of Things (IoT) has the potential to solve our biggest global challenges and bring people everywhere a better quality of life.

 

His rallies became magnets for free publicity. Onstage, he dispensed populism that drew thousands of supporters, many wearing his trademark “Make America Great Again” hats and chanting, “Build the wall!”

The events drew protests too— with demonstrators sometimes forcibly ejected.

When voting started, Trump was not so fast out of the gate.

He lost the Iowa caucuses in February, falling behind Cruz and barely edging Rubio for second. He recovered in New Hampshire. From there he and Cruz fiercely engaged, with Trump winning some and losing some but one way or another dominating the rest of the primary season — in votes or at least in attention — and ultimately in delegates.

He incurred relatively low campaign costs — just $57 million through the end of April. He covered most of it with at least $43 million of his own money loaned to the campaign.

Trump entered a new phase of his campaign Tuesday night by holding his first major campaign fundraiser: a $25,000-per-ticket dinner in Los Angeles.

Trump, 69, the son of a New York City real estate magnate, had risen to fame in the 1980s and 1990s, overseeing major real estate deals, watching his financial fortunes rise, then fall, hosting “The Apprentice” TV show and authoring more than a dozen books.

Associated Press writers James Nord in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Marc Levy in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, James MacPherson in Bismarck, North Dakota, Jill Colvin in Anaheim, California, Steve Peoples in Washington and Sean Murphy in Oklahoma City contributed to this report.

Investigation Looks at Actual Qualifications of Dentists to Extract Teeth

Investigation Looks at Actual Qualifications of Dentists to Extract Teeth

(HEADLINE NEWS guru 5/22/2016) It is important that all the potential risks, benefits, complications and alternative treatment options of tooth removal be reviewed with a patient prior to any surgery.
In the eyes of a dental professional, such as a general dentist or a board certified oral and maxillofacial surgeon, the definition of a “routine procedure” is objective. Most all professionals would argue that there are extractions which are more complicated than others, and this is the area that appears grey.1.
These more complex oral surgical procedures are often performed by non-oral surgeon (general dentist) professionals and yet there are no real stats to determine how many of these cases have a higher post-operative complication rate, versus if the patient would have gone to an oral surgeon.
WebMD recommends that patients research the education and training of their dentist under “recommendations for choosing a dentist.” This makes it appear that for a top visited website such as Web MD, a website that must be rather neutral and apolitical; they put significant weight on this topic’s importance. In fact, it is in their top three suggestions: advising patients to find a qualified professional when it is recommended to have a tooth extracted. WebMD even references the educational institutions from where the dentist graduated.2
So what does this tell us? It appears they are indirectly conveying an associated risk with choosing a professional that does not have the proper training or experience.
So how can patients safeguard and assure their best chance for a successful procedure? Headline News asked the top reviewed oral surgeon in Newport Beach, CA (according to Yelp, Health Grades, Google plus, and a list of other medical review authorities) for his opinion. 3dr_Tom_michaelis
Dr. Thomas R. Michaelis (www.DentalSurgery.guru) stated, “I see a lot of mistakes from general dentists who attempted procedures that were possibly above their training level. Today’s medical field has become so specialized; it is in the best interest of a patient to be treated by a team of dental specialists instead of a single “generalist”. In fact, I reverse refer a lot of my patients back to my team of general dentists for restorative work once surgery has been completed. The general dentists are extremely well trained in these restorative procedures and they are much better at it that I am. Even though I am also a dentist, I know that any patient of mine will be far better off having a general dentist perform their restorative work than me. However, my additional 6 years of medical education and surgical training beyond dental school has helped me perform procedures such as dental implants and wisdom tooth removal at the highest level, with proven success. I mean, if you were told you needed a hip replacement, would you prefer the board certified orthopedic surgeon or the family practioner who went to a weekend course? It’s the same principle. “
Dr. Michaelis went on to tell us that removing teeth, while not a particularly pleasant experience for patients, is a routine and uncomplicated procedure in the hands of a well-trained expert. For most oral surgeons, wisdom tooth removal is the mainstay of their practice and the 4 to 6 years of additional training beyond dental school helps minimize the complication rate and make the procedure as routine as possible.
What keeps a tooth in place in its native bone is a membrane or ligament that surrounds the tooth root called the periodontal ligament (“peri” – around; “odont” – root). The main fibers of the ligament surround the tooth at a slanted angle similar to a hammock and attach it to the bone. By carefully manipulating the tooth and with qualified training, these fibers can be fairly easily dislodged, allowing the tooth to be removed quite simply. Believe it or not, there is a real art and “feel” involved in tooth removal, making it both routine and relatively simple.2
To ensure the extraction is “simple” in the professional sense is not so simple. It involves proper assessment and diagnosis beforehand, in particular of the shape and status of the tooth or teeth to be removed, and the surrounding bone in which they are encased. Routine radiographic (x-ray) examination will allow that determination. In addition, the oral surgeon should also take a thorough medical and drug history, to both ensure that you are healthy enough to undergo this minor surgery, and that you have normal blood clotting and wound healing mechanisms.
Our investigation concurs with WebMD and the seemingly vast amount of other online resources whereas proper homework should be executed prior to choosing a dental professional for complex and noncomplex “routine” procedures. It is also important to realize that oral surgeons have an additional 4 to 6 years of medical education and surgical training compared to a general dentist. This fact is what really separates the specialist from the generalist and the importance of that difference should not be overlooked.
On a final note, it is important to understand that there is only one standard of care for dental surgery. This standard is always established by the specialists in the field. Just because a general dentist has 4-6 fewer years of education and surgical experience than an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, does not mean they are allowed to practice at a lower standard of care. They are held to the same standard as the specialist, but with less training.
1.http://www.deardoctor.com/inside-the-magazine/issue-15/tooth-extractio
2.http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/oral-health-care-providers?page=2n/#sthash.29UHrLQH.dpuf
3. https://dentalsurgery.guru/category/a-patients-advice-for-potential-patients/before-you-make-a-dental-surgery-decision-read-this/
4. W. Jerjes, T. Upile, F. Nhembe, D. Gudka, P. Shah, S. Abbas, E. McCarthy, S. Patel, J. Mahil & C. Hopper. Experience in third molar surgery: an update British Dental Journal 209, E1 (2010)
Published online: 2 July 2010 | doi:10.1038/sj.bdj.2010.581
_____________________________________________________________________Henry Thomas Whittikar – Medical Specialist Journalist
IJR News Assistant Editor in Chief Newport Coast, CA 657-222-7074

Xiaomi is getting into the drone business.

Xiaomi is getting into the drone business. The Chinese manufacturer mostly known for its aggressively priced high-end smartphones today introduced the Mi Drone, a camera-wielding quadcopter that undercuts comparable models from market leader DJI by over $300. Two models will be available: the cheaper one, priced at 2,499 Chinese Yuan (just over $380), will feature a 1080p camera, while the 4K model is 2,999 Yuan ($457).

The ball-shaped camera on the higher-end Mi Drone uses a Sony 12.4-megapixel sensor that can capture video at up to 3,840 x 2,160 at 30 fps and take RAW photos, while On the lower end 1080p model, Xiaomi has packed a 16-megapixel Sony backside illuminated CMOS and a 104-degree wide angle lens. Both feature a detachable gimbal that does 3-axis stabilization and is assisted by an optical flow sensor positioned between the camera and the battery bay on the back.

Xiaomi says the Mi drones will have 27 minutes of flying time on their 5,100 mAh batteries, with a range of of 3 kilometers. Like DJI, Xiaomi will build geofences into its drones to prevent them fromIn terms of design the drone itself looks quite a bit like DJI’s Phantom drones.

There’s a standalone controller with a dedicated button for take off and landing and a built-in smartphone clamp so you can use it as a viewfinder. flying into restricted areas. The drone will automatically return to base when its battery is dying or when it loses contact with the controller.

 

Obama: World leaders ‘rattled’ by Trump

President Barack Obama touched on the rancorous U.S. presidential race at a press conference Thursday from the G-7 summit in Japan, saying that presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump’s statements had his fellow world leaders concerned.

By Euan McKirdy, CNNUpdated 12:17 PM ET, Thu May 26, 2016
“They’re rattled by him and for good reason,” Obama said. “Because a lot of the proposals that he’s made display either ignorance of world affairs or a cavalier attitude or an interest in getting tweets and headlines instead of actually thinking through what is required to keep America safe.”
“They are surprised by (Trump), not sure how to take some of his pronouncements,” the President added.
Obama said the world is watching the campaign.
Opinion: Who in the world really wants Donald Trump to win?
“The world pays attention to U.S. elections,” Obama said. “They pay more attention to our elections sometimes than we pay to theirs. The U.S. is … at the heart of the international order and even those countries that are critical of us…know that ultimately things don’t hold together so well if the U.S. isn’t making good decisions and they count on us to provide stability when making global decisions.”

Slovenia – Melania, the third Mrs. Trump, is from Sevnica. Some locals are hopeful a Trump win might lead to publicity and additional donations from Melania. (She gave to the local health clinic after the 2006 birth of their son, Barron.)
Indonesia – 2015 saw the announcement of Trump’s first and second properties in Asia, with a resort situated in “the most magnificent location in Bali” and another in Lido Lakes that shall be “the pride of Indonesia.”
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Sweden – This popular Swedish site allows people to give Donald a blast of trump(et). It’s been blown 110,000,000 times and counting.
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Ireland – In 2014, Trump invested $20 million in a property in County Clare — the downside is that it’s collapsing into the sea. His proposal to build what Friends of the Irish Environment termed a “monster sea wall” met with local outrage.

China – Trump-branded clothes that don’t read “Made in Mexico” often say “Made in China.” Trump explained this in 2011 by declaring, “China so manipulates their currency it makes it almost impossible for American companies to compete.”

The Donald Trump travel guide – Donald Trump is truly a man of the world, even if the world doesn’t always see it that way. Click through the gallery to see what we mean.

Scotland – Trump’s development of an Aberdeen golf resort triggered a vicious (and still ongoing) feud with neighbors, who gave their side in the 2011 film “You’ve Been Trumped.”

Czech Republic – Clearly not content with being known just as the birthplace of Ivana, the first Mrs. Trump, the Czech town of Zlin in 2014 staged the country’s largest ever pillow fight.

Scotland – Trump’s development of an Aberdeen golf resort triggered a vicious (and still ongoing) feud with neighbors, who gave their side in the 2011 film “You’ve Been Trumped.”
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Mexico – “When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best,” Trump famously said. “They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.” This fiery Mexico City tribute shows how this statement went down in the country.

Germany – Kallstadt is Trump’s German ancestral home. However, when Deutsche Welle contacted Trump’s distant relations they elicited little more on the record than, “Hopefully this hype will ease up soon.”

Czech Republic – Clearly not content with being known just as the birthplace of Ivana, the first Mrs. Trump, the Czech town of Zlin in 2014 staged the country’s largest ever pillow fight.

People get ‘grumpy’
Asked about the continued divisiveness on display on the Democratic side of the 2016 race, Obama said people get “grumpy” during the primaries, including his own back in 2008, but will ultimately come together and argued that Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders largely agree on the policy front, but differ on tactics.
The President said that and that it’s important to finish the Democratic primary contest in a way that doesn’t leave anyone with ruffled feathers.
“I would urge and have urged, both sides to stick to the issues,” Obama said. “They’re both good people, I know them both well, and I think its’ important to try to end this in a way that leaves both sides feeling proud of what they’ve done.”
He added, “I guarantee you that the eventual nominee sure wishes it were over now. It’s a grind, it’s hard.”The president said he wanted the Democratic primary to “play out, let voters make up their minds.”
Obama also largely deflected questions about Clinton’s use of a private email server, saying he’s addressed the topic previously and the questions would be better put to the campaign.

 

Thursday morning saw the leaders of Japan, the U.S., UK, Italy, Germany, France, Italy and Canada gather in the grounds of the Ise-Jingu shrine, a 2,000-year-old temple in central Japan.
Obama also said he is going to Hiroshima Friday to underscore the “very real risks” of nuclear weapons and the “urgency that we all should have,” he said.
He will become the first U.S. President to visit the Japanese city where the first atomic bomb was dropped.
Obama told reporters that the dropping of the bomb was an “inflection point in modern history” and is something “all of us have had to deal with in one way or another.”

20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama shakes hands with chef Anthony Bourdain in a shopping area of Hanoi on May 24. The President sat down with Bourdain to film a scene for CNN’s “Parts Unknown.”
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
People gather in the rain to watch Obama’s motorcade in Hanoi on May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama meets with members of the Vietnamese Civil Society in Hanoi on May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama delivers remarks at the National Convention Center in Hanoi on May 24. Obama made a forceful case for human rights in Vietnam and called for the “peaceful resolution” of disputes in the South China Sea.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama walks to the left of Thi Kim Ngan, chairwoman of Vietnam’s National Assembly, at the Presidential Palace in Hanoi on Monday, May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama meets with Nguyen Phu Trong, the Vietnamese Communist Party’s general secretary, in Hanoi on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama, with Secretary of State John Kerry and other Cabinet members, attends a meeting with Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc, third from right, on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama gives a toast during a state luncheon hosted by Vietnam’s President in Hanoi on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama holds a news conference with Vietnamese President Tran Dai Quang on May 23. Obama announced the United States is fully lifting the decades-long ban on the sale of military equipment to Vietnam. He said the removal of the ban was part of a deeper defense cooperation with the country and dismissed suggestions it was aimed at countering China’s growing strength in the region.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
The two Presidents listen to their countries’ national anthems during a welcoming ceremony at the Presidential Palace in Hanoi on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
From left: Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, French President François Hollande, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, U.S. President Barack Obama, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, European Council President Donald Tusk and British Prime Minister David Cameron walk past the Kagura-den as they visit Ise Jingu shrine in Ise, Japan, on Thursday, May 26. Obama is visiting Japan and Vietnam during his 10th trip to Asia.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
World leaders join in a ceremony to plant trees at Ise Jingu shrine in Ise, Japan, on May 26. Obama and other major world leaders are in Japan for a Group of Seven, or G7, summit.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
From left: British Prime Minister David Cameron, Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, U.S. President Barack Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau talk together after a group photo session at the G7 summit in Shima, Japan, on May 26.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
U.S. President Barack Obama pauses for a translation during a bilateral meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Shima, Japan, on Wednesday, May 25.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama is greeted by U.S. Ambassador to Japan Caroline Kennedy and her husband, Edwin Arthur Schlossberg, at the airport in Tokoname, Japan, on May 25.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama shakes hands after speaking at a town-hall event in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, on May 25.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Vietnamese rapper Suboi raps during the town-hall event, which was for the Young Southeast Asian Leaders Initiative.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama tours through entrepreneur demonstrations in Ho Chi Minh City on Tuesday, May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama pays his respects during a visit to the Jade Pagoda in Ho Chi Minh City on May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama waves to locals during a visit to a shopping district in Hanoi, Vietnam, on May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama shakes hands with chef Anthony Bourdain in a shopping area of Hanoi on May 24. The President sat down with Bourdain to film a scene for CNN’s “Parts Unknown.”
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
People gather in the rain to watch Obama’s motorcade in Hanoi on May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama meets with members of the Vietnamese Civil Society in Hanoi on May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama delivers remarks at the National Convention Center in Hanoi on May 24. Obama made a forceful case for human rights in Vietnam and called for the “peaceful resolution” of disputes in the South China Sea.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama walks to the left of Thi Kim Ngan, chairwoman of Vietnam’s National Assembly, at the Presidential Palace in Hanoi on Monday, May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama meets with Nguyen Phu Trong, the Vietnamese Communist Party’s general secretary, in Hanoi on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama, with Secretary of State John Kerry and other Cabinet members, attends a meeting with Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc, third from right, on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama gives a toast during a state luncheon hosted by Vietnam’s President in Hanoi on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama holds a news conference with Vietnamese President Tran Dai Quang on May 23. Obama announced the United States is fully lifting the decades-long ban on the sale of military equipment to Vietnam. He said the removal of the ban was part of a deeper defense cooperation with the country and dismissed suggestions it was aimed at countering China’s growing strength in the region.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
The two Presidents listen to their countries’ national anthems during a welcoming ceremony at the Presidential Palace in Hanoi on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
From left: Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, French President François Hollande, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, U.S. President Barack Obama, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, European Council President Donald Tusk and British Prime Minister David Cameron walk past the Kagura-den as they visit Ise Jingu shrine in Ise, Japan, on Thursday, May 26. Obama is visiting Japan and Vietnam during his 10th trip to Asia.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
World leaders join in a ceremony to plant trees at Ise Jingu shrine in Ise, Japan, on May 26. Obama and other major world leaders are in Japan for a Group of Seven, or G7, summit.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
From left: British Prime Minister David Cameron, Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, U.S. President Barack Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau talk together after a group photo session at the G7 summit in Shima, Japan, on May 26.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
U.S. President Barack Obama pauses for a translation during a bilateral meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Shima, Japan, on Wednesday, May 25.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama is greeted by U.S. Ambassador to Japan Caroline Kennedy and her husband, Edwin Arthur Schlossberg, at the airport in Tokoname, Japan, on May 25.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama shakes hands after speaking at a town-hall event in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, on May 25.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Vietnamese rapper Suboi raps during the town-hall event, which was for the Young Southeast Asian Leaders Initiative.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama tours through entrepreneur demonstrations in Ho Chi Minh City on Tuesday, May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama pays his respects during a visit to the Jade Pagoda in Ho Chi Minh City on May 24.
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Obama waves to locals during a visit to a shopping district in Hanoi, Vietnam, on May 24.
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He added that the “backdrop of a nuclear event remains something that, I think, presses on the back of our imaginations.”
Obama also remarked on importance of reducing nuclear weapons and the progress made in that arena, citing the Iran deal.
Obama said that nuclear proliferation, particularly from North Korea, remained a major concern.
“Obviously ISIL using rifles, crude bombs, could kill a lot of people in a Paris or a Brussels and people are rightly insisting the world community stamp out ISIL and there is a reason why were focused on that,” he said, using another acronym for the terror group.

Obama and Vietnam’s ‘Queen of Hip Hop’ 01:58
But, he added: “We can’t focus on the short term … when you have a regime (in North Korea) that is so isolated and flouts international rules, devotes national resources hell bent on getting nuclear weapons.”
Obama said the G-7 meetings so far had been “extremely productive.”
“For us to (be able to) get together and focus on critical issues … is vitally important,” he said.
He said the meetings had focused on trade and issues facing the global economy, and how the group could work to accelerate growth and “put people back to work,” and the importance of stepping back from protectionist policies that leave countries collectively weaker.

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Sage Northcutt returns against Andrew Holbrook at UFC in New Jersey

Sage Northcutt returns against Andrew Holbrook at UFC in New Jersey

Sage Northcutt will get one more fight before he’s no longer a teenager when he takes on Andrew Holbrook at FOX UFC Fight Night in Newark, N.J. on Jan. 30.

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Josh Hedges/Zuffa LLC

Sage Northcutt will get one more fight before he’s no longer a teenager when he takes on Andrew Holbrook at FOX UFC Fight Night in Newark, N.J. on Jan. 30.

The 19-year-old prospect has been ultra-busy since making his debut at UFC 192 in October and following his win last week over Cody Pfister, Northcutt requested one more bout before he turns 20 in March.

The UFC granted his wish, and now Northcutt will return in January while looking to improve to 3-0 inside the Octagon.

Northcutt has finished his first two fights in impressive fashion, with a TKO victory in his debut before submitting Pfister with a guillotine choke last Thursday in Las Vegas.

He’ll face his stiffest test to date in January as he faces Holbrook, who is 11-0 during his career after making his UFC debut in July

Holbrook eked out a close decision over Ramsey Nijem in a fight he accepted on short notice, and now he’ll fight on the main card on FOX in January with a chance to take out a rising star in Northcutt.

Northcutt vs. Holbrook joins the upcoming FOX UFC Fight Night card in Newark with a light heavyweight bout between Anthony “Rumble” Johnson and Ryan Bader headlining the show.

Comprehensive tax information for Uber drivers and Lyft drivers goes beyond TurboTax tips

(2/1/2016 Headline News.Guru) I Drive with Uber (IDWU), the evolving authority for Uber and Lyft drivers, released free comprehensive tax information specifically geared towards ridesharing drivers.

I Drive With Uber is regarded as a leading authority and information provider for Uber drivers. The website’s mission is to do just that – provide information for Uber and Lyft drivers/passengers that goes beyond the actual Uber website.

Time For Taxes Message Shows Taxation Due
Time For Taxes Message Showing Taxation Due

If you are one of the many new drivers for Uber or Lyft (or one of other ride sharing companies), filing your 2015 taxes is most likely uncharted territory for you. “I Drive With Uber” realized this and collaborated with a tax specialist to lay down the ‘rules and regulations’, and created a tax preparation guide for drivers. I Drive With Uber is providing this free extensive info packet on their website.

Uber identifies its drivers as independent contractors and not as employees. This subject, whether Uber drivers should be classified as employees or independent contractors, is currently being litigated in numerous states in the US. However, until a decision has been reached, Uber drivers will have to file taxes as self-employed individuals (1099 contractors).

This is one of the key points the tax guide on the IDWU website focuses on: the difference between being a 1099 independent contractor versus a traditional employee (which many new drivers mistakenly think they are). Furthermore, the guide elaborates on the tax benefits and deductions that are available for ride share drivers. Many drivers will be surprised about the numerous tax deductions they are actually entitled to.

The IDWU guide provides relevant information for any Uber or Lyft driver in the process of preparing for the current 2016 tax season. Other than the above-mentioned topics, other covered subjects include: self-employment tax, estimated tax payments, Social Security tax, Medicare tax, and many more. If you’re thinking of becoming an Uber driver or already are driving for Uber or Lyft, IDWU is a valuable information platform for you.

Michael Gingino \ 2012 Multi awarded ICFJ Honoree

Headline News Guru – International Journalism Review

657 222-7074 Newport Coast / New York

Top candidates attack but express cautious optimism about winning

Headlinenews.guru 2/1/2016 – The first major test for the 2016 presidential candidates is now just hours away with the Iowa Caucus on Monday — its outcome a likely sign of whether front-running Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump can hold their leads or if the unpredictable and often-angry electorate has other plans.

Trump and Clinton made their closing arguments Sunday, barnstorming across Iowa and battling on the political shows, in a final effort to beat back close rivals like Democratic candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders and Republican Sen. Ted Cruz, both eager for an upset in the first-in-the-nation balloting.

“Thirty six hours from now, the men and women of Iowa are going to caucus,” Cruz, who is trailing Trump in Iowa by roughly 5 percentage points, told “Fox News Sunday.” “And we have a grassroots army. We’ve got 12,000 volunteers in the state.”

Still, Cruz, who argues that he’s the true conservative in the GOP field, was, like the rest of this year’s White House candidates, steering clear of predicting a win, then having to face the fallout from a loss or even a below-expectations finish.

“Right now, this is all about turnout,” said Cruz, a Texas senator in a close race for second with Florida Sen. Marco Rubio. “This is all about who shows up tomorrow night at 7. … If conservatives come out, we will win.”

Sanders, a Vermont independent, told ABC’s “This Week”: “I think we have a shot to win it, if people come out.”

His populist message about the economy being “rigged” against the middle class and “billionaires buying elections” has resonated with the largely disaffected and angry electorate and has posed a clear alternative to the Clinton political dynasty.

Even the supremely confident Trump, who has a double-digit national lead over the GOP field, tamped down Iowa expectations Sunday.

“I don’t have to win it,” he said on CBS’ “Face the Nation.” “I’m doing really well with the evangelicals in Iowa. But I’m also doing tremendously well all over the country with the evangelicals. … I think we have a good chance of winning Iowa.”

Still, Trump, who has a wider lead among the more independent-minded voters of New Hampshire, who vote second, on Feb. 9, realizes the importance of a lead-off victory.

“I have a very substantial lead in New Hampshire,” he told CBS. “But I think it would be really good to win Iowa. I’d like to win Iowa.”

And at least 9 percent of potential Iowa caucus-goers remain undecided, according to a Des Moines Register-Bloomberg Politics poll released Saturday.

After New Hampshire, the voting continues in South Carolina and Nevada, with the outcomes of those so-called “early-state votes” expected to winnow the GOP’s 11-candidate field.

After Trump and Cruz, Rubio is the only other GOP candidate with double-digit poll numbers.

They are followed by retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, Ohio Gov. John Kasich, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, former business executive Carly Fiorina and former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum.

Santorum and Huckabee, popular among social conservatives, won Iowa in 2012 and 2008, respectively.

Though none of the candidates below Rubio is expected to make a strong Iowa finish, Kasich, Christie and even Bush could do well in New Hampshire and challenge the frontrunners — as the GOP and Democratic races head across the south and into the late spring before this summer’s nominating conventions.

Kasich was the only candidate in New Hampshire on Sunday, telling potential voters at an Elks Lodge in Salem that cutting regulations that kill small businesses would be a priority of his first 100 days, if elected president.

Trump and Cruz each attended Sunday morning church services with family members.

Trump attended services at the First Christian Orchard Campus, a nondenominational church in Council Bluffs.

Cruz went to the Lutheran Church of Hope, outside Des Moines. The sermon called on politicians to treat their opponents with love, not attack ads.

Trump has tapped into the angry electorate with plans to build a wall along the southern U.S. border to keep out “drug dealers” and others from Mexico. And in the wake of two recent terror attacks, he proposed keeping Muslim from entering the United States until the government improves its immigrant-screening process.

Amid some public outcry, Trump’s poll numbers increased by double digits after his called for the ban, in the aftermath of the San Bernardino, Calif., massacre in December.

Since Cruz emerged in recent weeks as Trump’s closest primary rival, Trump has called Cruz “a nasty guy” and a “liar,” particularly about whether Trump essentially supports ObamaCare.

The only other Democratic candidate is former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley, who has single-digit poll numbers.

The front-running Clinton, who has a superior fundraising and campaign apparatus, continues to hold a roughly 25-point national lead over Sanders.

However, the former first lady has been stuck defending herself in a controversy about her use of a private server/email setup to conduct official business when secretary of state.

On Friday, the State Department said it had identified 22 “top secret” emails that it would not release, as part of a court order to make public Clinton’s email correspondence.

“It’s a continuation of a story that’s been playing out for months,” Clinton told ABC News.

Clinton also said that none of the emails was marked classified at the time, and she again called for their released, in an apparent effort to help end the controversy. She also suggested that Republicans were “grabbing at straws” on the issue.

“I want to see them disclosed,” she told ABC.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Obama holds historic meeting with Cuba’s Castro, pledges to ‘turn the page’

President Obama held a historic formal meeting with Cuban President Raul Castro Saturday, the first between US and Cuban leaders in over half a century, pledging to ‘turn the page’ and develop a new relationship between the two countries.

The two leaders shook hands Friday at the start of the summit and met Saturday on the sidelines of the a Panama City convention center.
Obama holds historic meeting with Cuba’s Castro, pledges to ‘turn the page’
Obama and Castro met for about an hour, with Obama telling reporters before the meeting that, after 50 years of unchanged policy, it was time to try something new and to engage with both Cuba’s government and its people.

“What we have both concluded is that we can disagree with a spirit of respect and civility,” Obama said. “And over time, it is possible for us to turn the page and develop a new relationship between our two countries.”

Obama thanked Castro “for the spirit of openness and courtesy that he has shown during our interactions” and pledged to do whatever he could to “make sure that the people of Cuba are able to prosper and live in freedom and security.”

Castro, for his part, said he agreed with everything Obama had said. However, he added the caveat that they had “agreed to disagree” at times. Castro said he had told the Americans that Cuba was willing to discuss issues such as human rights and freedom of the press, maintaining that “everything can be on the table.”

“We are disposed to talk about everything — with patience,” Castro said in Spanish. “Some things we will agree with, and others we won’t.”

Not since 1958 have a U.S. and Cuban leader convened a substantial meeting. Dwight Eisenhower and Fulgencio Batista met that year, and the following year, former Cuban President Fidel Castro met with Richard Nixon, who was vice president at the time.

The flurry of diplomacy was aimed at injecting fresh momentum into their months-old plan to restore normal relations between their countries.

The historic gathering played out on the sidelines of the Summit of the Americas, which this year included Cuba for the first time. Although the meeting wasn’t publicly announced in advance, White House aides had suggested the two leaders were looking for an opportunity to meet while in Panama and to discuss the ongoing efforts to open embassies in Havana and Washington, among other issues.

Obama had pledged earlier on Saturday not to refight the battles of the Cold War.

“The Cold War has been over for a long time,” Obama said at the summit. “And I’m not interested in having battles frankly that started before I was born.”

Castro later rallied to Obama’s defense, absolving the president of fault for the U.S. blockade in a stunning reversal of more than 50 years of animosity between the United States and Cuba.

“In my opinion, President Obama is an honest man,” Castro said — a remarkable vote of confidence from the Cuban leader, who praised Obama’s life and his “humble background.”

In January, the Obama administration began to chip away at the U.S. embargo against Cuba, announcing new changes taking effect Friday that will allow more trade and travel between the two countries.

The changes were announced despite concerns from members of Congress that the landmark shift in U.S.-Cuba relations is a “one-sided deal” that will benefit the Castro regime.

And they have since been questioned by the only two official Republican candidates for president in 2016 – Sens. Ted Cruz, Texas, and Rand Paul, Kentucky.

At a recent summit in California sponsored by the Koch brothers-backed Freedom Partners, Paul argued that a half-century of economic embargoes have failed to remove leaders Fidel and Raul Castro.

“The Castro brothers are brutal dictators,” responded Cruz, a Cuban-American.

Castro, on Saturday, in a meandering, nearly hour-long speech to the summit, ran through an exhaustive history of perceived Cuban grievances against the U.S. dating back more than a century — a vivid display of how raw passions remain over American attempts to undermine Cuba’s government.

Then, in an abrupt about face, he apologized for letting his emotions get the best of him. He said many U.S. presidents were at fault for that troubled history — but that Obama isn’t one of them.

“I have told President Obama that I get very emotional talking about the revolution,” Castro said through a translator, noting that Obama wasn’t even born when the U.S. began sanctioning the island nation. “I apologize to him because President Obama had no responsibility for this.”

Speaking just before Castro, Obama acknowledged that deep differences between their countries would persist. Yet he said he was uninterested in getting bogged down in ideology, instead casting the thaw in relations as an opening to create “more opportunities and resources for the Cuban people.”

“The United States will not be imprisoned by the past,” Obama said. “We’re looking to the future.”

Yet the optimistic tone from the president wasn’t enough to offset the skepticism of some Latin American leaders about U.S. intentions in the region, including many who have sharply criticized recent U.S. sanctions against Venezuelan officials.

Even President Dilma Rousseff of Brazil, whose country is a close U.S. partner, told the summit that such unilateral policies of isolation are always counterproductive and ineffective. “For that reason we reject the adoption of sanctions against Venezuela,” she said.

Raising the stakes even higher for the two leaders was mounting speculation that Obama would use the occasion of the summit taking place in Panama to announce his decision to remove Cuba from the U.S. list of state sponsors of terrorism, a gesture that for Cuba holds both practical and symbolic value.

The U.S. long ago stopped accusing Cuba of conducting terrorism, and Obama has signaled that he’s ready to take Cuba off the list. Earlier in the week he suggested an announcement was imminent when he revealed that the State Department had completed its lengthy review of the designation.

Removal from the terror list is a top priority for Castro because it would not only purge a stain on Cuba’s pride, but also ease its ability to conduct simple financial transactions. Castro said Cuba should never have been on the list in the first place.

“Yes, we have conducted solidarity with other peoples that could be considered terrorism — when we were cornered, when we were strongly harassed,” he said. “We had no other choice but to give up or to fight back.”

Yet Obama’s delay in delisting Cuba comes as the U.S. seeks concessions of its own — namely, the easing of restrictions on American diplomats’ freedom of movement in Havana and better human rights protections. Obama said the U.S. would continue pressing Cuba on human rights even as he called for Congress to lift the economic embargo on the island nation 90 miles to the south of Florida.

A successful relaunch of U.S.-Cuba relations would form a cornerstone of Obama’s foreign policy legacy. But it’s an endeavor he can’t undertake alone: Only Congress can fully lift the onerous U.S. sanctions regime on Cuba, and there are deep pockets of opposition in the U.S. to taking that step.

Obama was scheduled to take questions from reporters before returning to Washington.

Tsarnaev-guilty-of-all-30-counts-in-Boston-bombing

Tsarnaev guilty of all 30 counts in Boston bombing

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, his face a blank, stood with his head bowed and his hands clasped as the guilty verdicts tolled one after another for what seemed like an eternity: Guilty of using weapons of mass destruction, guilty of bombing a place of public use, guilty of conspiracy and aiding and abetting. Guilty, guilty, guilty: The word was spoken 32 times.

Yes, the jury said, Tsarnaev caused the deaths of Krystle Campbell, Martin Richard, Lingzi Lu and Sean Collier. Yes, it was murder. And so, the word “yes” was spoken 63 times, each time making Tsarnaev eligible for the death penalty.

From start to finish, it took 26 minutes for the jury to announce its verdict in the Boston Marathon bombing trial: Tsarnaev didn’t skate on a single charge. He now stands guilty of all 30 counts, 17 of which could send him to death row.

If hearing the verdicts seemed overwhelming, that paled in comparison to seeing and hearing evidence behind them: awful images and sounds. The jury saw bombs explode and tear people apart. They saw streets splashed crimson with blood and littered with severed limbs and body parts. They heard the cries of the injured, and witnesses told them how people tended to the dying and gravely injured, unaware of their own injuries as they tied belts around the mangled limbs of friends and strangers alike.

They heard a prosecutor explain why this was done: Tsarnaev was punishing Americans and sending a message to the holy warriors of radical Islam to rise up.

And they saw surveillance photos of Tsarnaev, who prosecutors described as a callous killer, strolling through the aisles of Whole Foods to buy milk and smiling as he stopped by his college gym shortly after the deadly bombing.

Wednesday’s verdict was a major step in the trial, but the toughest legal battles may be yet to come.

The trial will resume, possibly early next week, for a second phase to determine Tsarnaev’s punishment.

The jury’s next assignment: deciding whether the man responsible for the worst act of terrorism on U.S. soil since September 11, 2001, should pay with his life.

It took the jury of seven women and five men 11½ hours of deliberations to reach their verdict. Tsarnaev, 21, didn’t look at jurors as their decisions were read.

Survivors of the bombing said they were gratified by Wednesday’s decision, but found no joy in it.

“Obviously we are grateful for the outcome today,” bombing survivor Karen Brassard said after the verdict was announced. “It’s not a happy occasion, but it’s something that we can put one more step behind us.”

Jeff Bauman, who lost his legs in the bombing, said he was relieved.

“Today’s verdict will never replace the lives that were lost and so dramatically changed,” he said, “but it is a relief, and one step closer to closure.”

Federal prosecutors are now focusing on the trial’s upcoming penalty phase, said Carmen Ortiz, the U.S. Attorney for the District of Massachusetts. “We are gratified by the jury’s verdict and thank everyone who played a role in the trial for their hard work,” Oritz said, declining to comment further.

In the next phase of the trial, jurors will hear evidence of what makes Tsarnaev’s crimes so heinous he should be executed. The defense will try to soften his actions by painting him in a more sympathetic light.

Tsarnaev’s attorney, Judy Clarke, is one of the nation’s foremost experts on keeping clients off death row.

She has successfully fought for the lives of Ted Kaczynski, aka the Unabomber, and Jared Loughner, the gunman who killed a judge and wounded former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords.

For weeks, Clarke has been laying the groundwork for her argument to persuade the jury to spare Tsarnaev’s life.

Although there had been doubts that Tsarnaev could receive a fair trial in Boston, the case moved quickly and smoothly once testimony began on March 5. Some 96 witnesses testified over 15 court days: 92 for the prosecution and four for the defense.

The defense all but conceded guilt during this part of the trial, choosing instead to focus its efforts on persuading the jury during the penalty phase to spare Tsarnaev’s life.

The low-key strategy played in stark contrast to the emotionally wrenching case put on by prosecutors, who displayed videos and photographs of the dead, the dying and the maimed along Boylston Street.

Jurors saw graphic scenes of a street awash in blood and severed limbs and the dazed, traumatized expressions on people’s faces. They heard screams and moans. It looked like a war zone, several witnesses said.

Other witnesses described how deafening and disorienting it was to have a bomb go off nearby. Some survivors said they could see people screaming but could not hear them. They felt like they were underwater as the surreal events unfolded around them. Several said they felt nauseated by the “vile” stench of gunpowder and burning hair and flesh.

The jury heard a young woman, now in college, describe how it felt to nearly die; Sydney Corcoran said she felt cold, but peaceful as the blood drained from her body.

As they viewed a video shot by spectator Colton Kilgore, jurors could hear the cries of a 5-year-old boy. They saw his mother’s bones protruding from her leg and shredded hand as she reached for him. Others in the background were scrambling to apply tourniquets.

“My bones were laying next to me on the sidewalk,” said Rebekah Gregory. “That’s the day I thought I was going to die.”

They heard the urgent voices of spectators suddenly turned into first responders. Tourniquets were quickly fashioned from belts and running clothes brought by the armload from Marathon Sports, a store near the first bomb site along Boylston Street.

Witnesses described the agonizing decisions they made about whom they could help and who was beyond saving. Shane O’Hara, the manager of Marathon Sports, said the day still haunts him.

“All you heard were sirens, cries and screams,” he said. “The thing that haunts me is making decisions — who needed help first, who needed more, who was more injured than the other one. I felt it wasn’t my role to make those decisions, but you have to do that.”

O’Toole told jurors he was sorry they had to view such gruesome images, but urged them to view them clinically, as evidence. He said they were necessary to show what happened.

Prosecutors said Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev steeped themselves in writings and lectures of top al Qaeda leaders who urged young men to avenge injustice to Muslims by waging holy war against the enemies of Islam, including the United States.

The militant literature promised paradise and other awards to any warrior who died as a martyr for jihad.

The plan to bomb the marathon was hatched a year earlier, prosecutors alleged. The brothers chose the event because “all eyes would be on Boston that day,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Aloke Chakravarty said.

“He chose a day where there would be civilians on the sidewalks. And he and his brother targeted those civilians — men, women and children — because he wanted to make a point. He wanted to terrorize this country. He wanted to punish America for what it was doing to his people.”

The brothers took their war from an 800-square-foot apartment in Cambridge to Boston’s Boylston Street shortly before 3 p.m. on Monday, April 15, 2013.

“That day they felt like they were soldiers,” Chakravary said. “They were the mujahedeen.”

The videos showed the brothers carrying the bombs in backpacks and moving through the crowd near the marathon finish line. It was, the prosecutor said, “a coordinated attack.”

Tamerlan Tsarnaev set off the first bomb near Marathon Sports, according to testimony. The 6-quart pressure cooker contained gunpowder, nails and BBs and was sealed with duct tape.

It took the life of Krystle Campbell, a 29-year-old restaurant manager, and the legs of several other people.

The second pressure cooker bomb, carried in by Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, went off 12 seconds later in front of the Forum restaurant. That bomb killed two people — Martin Richard, 8, and Lingzi Lu, 23, a graduate student from China.

Surveillance video shows Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, wearing a turned-around white ball cap, lingering for four minutes by a tree. He slips his backpack off his shoulder. In front of him, a row of children, including Martin Richard, stands behind a metal barricade.

“These children weren’t innocent to him,” Chakravarty told jurors. “They were American. He knew what the bag was designed to do.”

Martin was torn apart by the blast, and his sister, Jane, lost a leg. Their father, Bill Richard, testified that he immediately knew his son would not survived his injuries, and focused on getting help for Jane.

“I saw a little boy who had his body severely damaged by an explosion,” Richard testified. He paused, adding, “This is difficult. I just knew from what I saw that there was no chance. The color of his skin, and so on. I knew in my head that I needed to act quickly or we might not only lose Martin, we might lose Jane, too.”

Lu flailed her arms and screamed before bleeding to death in the street. Her leg was shredded from her ankle to her hip.

Defense: He followed his brother’s lead
The defense disputes little about what happened and instead focused on why it happened. Lead defense attorney Judy Clarke all but conceded that Tsarnaev is guilty, and has focused instead on persuading jurors to spare him from the death penalty in the trial’s next phase.

Clarke disputed the prosecutors’ arguments that their client was bent on becoming a holy warrior, although she acknowledged the horror the bombs caused and said her client’s actions were “inexcusable.”

“For this destruction, suffering and profound loss, there is no excuse,” she said. “No one is trying to make one. Planting bombs at the Boston Marathon one year and 51 weeks ago was a senseless act.”

She asked jurors to keep their minds open to what is to come — a case based heavily on the Tsarnaev family’s troubled history and the control and influence Tamerlan Tsarnaev held over his younger brother. Tamerlan was the mastermind of the bomb plot, Clarke said. He bought the pressure cookers and built the bombs. He researched the marathon as a possible event to attack. He shot and killed Collier at MIT.

Jahar merely followed his lead, she said.

“It was Tamerlan,” Clarke said, over and over in her closing argument to the jury.

Tamerlan downloaded the jihadist material urging young men to wage holy war against the infidels while Jahar spent most of his time on Facebook, Clarke said.

“He was a kid doing kid things.”

But prosecutors insisted the brothers were “partners in crime,” working together to punish Americans for what they perceived as crimes against Muslims.

“He wanted to terrorize this country,” said Chakravartay. “He wanted to punish America for what it was doing to his people. And that’s what he did.”

“Tamerlan Tsarnaev didn’t turn his brother into a murderer,” said another prosecutor, Assistant U.S. Attorney William Weinreb. “If you are capable of such hate, such callousness that you can murder and maim 20 people and then drive to Whole Foods and buy some milk, can you really blame it on your brother?”

Prosecutors used computer searches to show that both brothers were steeped in jihadist writings and lectures. They acted calmly and with purpose, believing they were right, Chakravarty said.

He also told jurors they had to look no futher than Tsarnaev’s manifesto, written with a pencil on the side of a boat where he hid during the manhunt. It showed, more than anything else, how he had adopted the beliefs of the jihadists as his own.

“In that boat, with helicopters overhead and sirens blaring, he chose to write something to the American people,” the prosecutor said, adding he probably believed he was spending his final moments on Earth.

“In that boat, when the helicopters were overhead, the sirens were blaring, there were police canvassing, looking for him, he was all alone, and in his voice he chose to write something to the American people,” Chakravarty said.

He wrote in the first person. He was an “I,” not a “we.”

The prosecutor displayed a photograph of the writing on the sides of a boat pocked by bullets and streaked with Tsarnaev’s blood, and read the manifesto in its entirety.

“I am jealous of my brother who has received the reward of (paradise.) … I do not mourn because his soul is very much alive. God has a plan for each person. Mine was to hide in this boat and shed some light on our actions.”

He asked God to make him a martyr so he could “be among all the righteous people in the highest levels of heaven.”

Then he lashed out against America:

“The U.S. government is killing our innocent civilians, but most of you already know that. As a Muslim, I can’t stand to see such evil go unpunished. We Muslims are one body. You hurt one, you hurt us all.”

He wrote that the Muslim nation is beginning to rise, along with the soldiers of the holy war. “Know that you are fighting men who look into the barrel of your gun and see heaven. Now, how can you compete with that? We are promised victory and we will surely get it. Now I don’t like killing innocent people. It is forbidden in Islam. But due to (bullet hole), it is allowed.”

He was not yet finished. He carved another message into a wooden slat inside the boat: “Stop killing our people and we will stop.”

Chakravarty said Tsarnaev wanted to be “a terrorist hero.” He was making a statement. He was proud of the choices he made.

And, while he hid in that boat and the police closed in on him, the prosecutor said, Tsarnaev “was negotiating the terms of death with the people of America.”

Critics-call-credit-card-chip-in-US-joke

Why critics call the imminent credit card chip system in the U.S. ‘a joke’

The way Americans spend money is on the verge of its biggest change in decades, but the drumbeat of doubters continues to get louder. New chip-enabled credit cards are slowly getting into consumers’ hands in advance of a looming deadline later this year. But a Walmart executive recently told CNN that U.S. chip cards are a “joke,” and a new report examining other countries’ changeovers suggests criminals around the globe merely switched tactics and kept right on stealing from consumers’ accounts.

The switch to chip cards goes by the shorthand EMV, which stands for Europay, Mastercard and Visa. In Europe, when banks implemented the change, government rules forced consumers to start using credit cards like debit cards – requiring that PIN codes be entered each time a card is used. The change adds two important levels of security, or two-factor security. To complete a transaction, buyers need to have in their hands a chip card, which is incredibly challenging to counterfeit. And they must know something — a PIN — that’s not on the card.

The U.S. is poised to implement only half this system. Chip cards must be accepted by merchants by the fall deadline, but not PINs. The so-called “chip & signature” system is a half-measure, according to Mike Cook, Wal-Mart’s assistant treasurer and a senior vice president.

“The fact that we didn’t go to PIN is such a joke,” Cook told CNNMoney.com.

For example, a criminal who physically steals a chip & signature credit card will have no trouble using it to commit fraud in a store by faking the consumers’ signature.

Meanwhile, a report issued recently by analyst firm Mercator raises even more concerns that the switch to chip cards might not reduce fraud, but simply nudge criminals towards different fraud.

“Unless the payment industry tackles other growing concerns like lost and stolen card fraud, overall fraud losses will continue to spiral up toward pre-EMV levels,” the report says.

Why? So-called “card-not-present” fraud is on the rise in places that adopted EMV long ago, according Mercator’s Tristan Hugo-Webb, who is Associate Director of the Global Payments Advisory Service.

For example, the United Kingdom was one of the first countries in the E.U. to complete the switchover to EMV back in 2006. While counterfeit card fraud has shrunk — from 27 percent of all fraud in 2003 to 13 percent in 2013 — other kinds of fraud have soared. Card-not-present fraud, which includes online and telephone sales, has climbed from 29 percent of fraud in 2003 to 67 percent in 2013. Chip cards have no impact on online or telephone sale fraud because the chips cannot be used for authentication.

So as e-commerce has risen, online fraud has risen right along with it. In the U.K., there has been a sharp increase since 2011, Hugo-Webb says.

New technologies that would add a layer of authentication to online purchases, such as electronic tokens that help verify consumers remotely, have been invented but have not been implemented.

“The hope is that with the creation of new security technologies like tokenization, the industry can begin to play offense rather than always having to play defense against payment fraud attacks,” Hugo-Webb says.

The trickiest part of the migration is that the U.S. is so far behind – at least a decade behind the U.K, for example – that new payment forms, such as mobile payments, may have overtaken old-fashioned plastic cards by the time the EMV adoption is complete. To some observers that lessons the urgency of the changeover.

But Hugo-Webb says the U.S. must still migrate, even if the step doesn’t reduce fraud. It’s more a matter of holding serve, he said.

“If the U.S. decided to skip EMV….it would be more of a target than it is today,” he said. “There is still value in migrating….it’s going to take a lot longer than people expect for mobile payments to really become commonplace.”

Because of the decade-long delay, however, the value of the upgraded security will be less in the U.S. than it was in Europe, however, where banks enjoyed at least a few years of reduced fraud before criminals caught up. Here in the U.S. criminals already have quite a head start on their EMV workarounds.

That fact should help inform banks and merchants as they consider how much to invest in new forms of security for the coming generation of payment systems.

GitHub-Still-Fighting-DDoS-Attack

GitHub Still Fighting DDoS Attack

GitHub is still battling what it says is the largest DDoS (distributed denial of service) attack in the service’s history.
What began around 10 p.m. Eastern Wednesday was still underway on Monday morning, according to GitHub’s Twitter feed.
In a Friday blog post, GitHub suggested that the attack was launched “to convince us to remove a specific class of content.”
According to The Wall Street Journal, the ongoing cyber assault directed massive volumes of traffic from China’s popular Baidu search engine to GitHub, paralyzing GitHub’s website in what appears to be an attempt to shut down anti-censorship tools.
Citing unnamed security experts, the Journal said traffic was directed specifically to two GitHub pages with links to websites that are banned in China—one from Greatfire.org that helps users circumvent government censorship, the other the New York Times’ Chinese-language site.
As of press time, Greatfire’s website was reporting a connection error; the company has asked Twitter users to send samples of the code behind the attack.
The Times declined to comment to PCMag.
GitHub did not speculate about who is behind the onslaught, saying only that it is “completely focused on mitigating this attack.”
“Our top priority is making sure github.com is available to all our users while deflecting malicious traffic,” the company said.
Just before 8 a.m. ET, the GitHub status page said “All systems reporting at 100%. Attack traffic continues, so we remain on high alert.” The same messages was tweeted by the company about 12 hours before.
“It is reprehensible that the censorship policies and actions of a nation-state are affecting” the largest code host in the world, Richard Bejtlich, chief security strategist at FireEye, wrote in a recent blog post.”The Chinese government is forcing GitHub to expend its private resources in order to continue serving its customers.”
Bejtlich called on the U.S. and other “like-minded governments” to “tell the Chinese to immediately stop this activity.”
Confirming reports that HTTP traffic originating outside of China was being redirected elsewhere, Baidu told PCMag that its security team is conducting a thorough investigation.
“[We] can say that we did not experience a security breach,” the company said in a statement, “and do not appear to have been hacked. We have informed other security organizations and are working with them to get to the bottom of this.”
According to cybersecurity firm F-Secure, the attack likely involved Chinese authorities, and used traffic from people outside the country, making the attack harder to block, the Journal said.
A bit closer to home, Rutgers University in New Jersey said it is also battling a DDoS attack, which possibly originated in Ukraine, NBC New York reported.

Bergdahl-letter-outlines-torture

New Bergdahl letter outlines torture

Washington (CNN)House Speaker John Boehner said Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is “innocent until proven guilty” after the U.S. military charged him with desertion and misbehavior before the enemy, but emphasized in an exclusive interview with CNN’s Dana Bash that he was more concerned about the circumstances of his release.

Bergdahl’s attorney also released a statement on Wednesday, outlining his defense of the soldier and containing a two-page letter from Bergdahl describing the torture he endured, which included months spent chained to a bed and further years spent chained on all fours or locked in a cage.

“Well, like any American, you’re innocent until proven guilty. And these charges are coming. There will be a trial,” he told Bash in an interview taped Wednesday to air Sunday on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

Boehner said the “more troubling part of this” is the fact that the U.S. government traded five Taliban fighters for Bergdahl’s release, and that recent reports indicate one has returned to the battlefield. He expressed concerns about other detainees held at the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, which President Barack Obama is working to close, “ending up back on the battlefield and threatening Americans here and abroad.”

Obama “violated the law” in failing to alert Congress before the prisoner swap occurred, Boehner added.

“And I still believe that’s the more troubling part of this,” he said. “We’ve made clear in the past that we won’t negotiate with terrorists, and but yet here we did.”

Military officials announced Wednesday afternoon they would charge Bergdahl with one count each of desertion and misbehavior before the enemy.

Bergdahl left his post in Afghanistan before being captured and held captive for five years. For that, he faces charges that carry a maximum penalty of life in a military prison, and he could also have to forfeit pay and be stripped of his rank, Army Col. Daniel King said as he announced the charges.

Bergdahl faces a military procedure similar to a grand jury that will whether charges are appropriate, King said. Then, he could face court martial proceedings.

The decision comes nearly a year after Bergdahl returned to the United States as part of a prisoner exchange and since the Army began a formal investigation into his disappearance from his unit in eastern Afghanistan in June 2009.

The Army concluded its investigation into the circumstances of Bergdahl’s capture in December. Until now, it has been in the hands of Gen. Mark Milley, head of U.S. Army Forces Command, who made the decision to charge Bergdahl. Several U.S. military officials CNN has spoken with suggested privately that the process took longer than expected.

Ahead of Wednesday’s announcement, officials said Milley only had a few choices. Though the sense had been that Bergdahl must be held accountable for his actions, there had been little appetite for a lengthy term in military confinement given the five years Bergdahl was held by the Taliban.

Shortly after the charges were announced, Bergdahl’s attorneys released a lengthy statement that includes a letter sent to Milley earlier this month outlining their defense of the soldier.

“In light of the nearly five years of harsh captivity Sgt. Bergdahl endured, the purpose of his leaving his unit, and his behavior while a prisoner, it would be unduly harsh to impose on him the lifetime stigma of a court-martial conviction or an other than honorable discharge and to deny him veterans benefits,” attorney Eugene R. Fidell writes in the letter.

The statement includes a two-page accounting from Bergdahl of his time in captivity, in which he recounts months spent chained to a bed, then further years spent chained on all fours or locked in a cage.

Bergdahl said for years his body and health declined due to malnourishment, and sores on his wrists and ankles from the shackles grew infected.

“My body started a steady decline in constant internal sickness that would last through the final year,” he said.

Bergdahl was frequently beaten, at times with copper wire or a thick rubber hose, and forced to watch Taliban videos, he said. He had no concept of time, and was repeatedly told he would be killed and would never again see his family.

“I was kept in constant isolation during the entire five years, with little to no understanding of time, through periods of constant darkness, periods of constant light, and periods of completely random flickering of light and absolutely no understanding of anything that was happening beyond the door I was held behind,” he wrote.

Bergdahl tried a dozen times to escape, he wrote.

Now 28, Bergdahl was taken by the Haqqani terrorist network. But the circumstances of Bergdahl’s departure from his base and how willingly he left have not been clear.

King said he couldn’t offer those details on Wednesday, and that they’re being treated as evidence for the upcoming proceedings against Bergdahl.

Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain, R-Arizona, called the charges an “important step” on Wednesday.

“This is an important step in the military justice process towards determining the accountability of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl,” he said in a statement. “I am confident that the Department of the Army will continue to ensure this process is conducted with the utmost integrity under the Uniform Code of Military Justice.”

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-South Carolina, meanwhile, lambasted the “unevenness” of Obama’s swap of five Taliban prisoners for Bergdahl.

“I wouldn’t have done this trade for a Medal of Honor winner,” he told CNN. “No military member should expect their country to turn over five Taliban commanders to get their release. Nobody should expect that. It’s not the nature of his service that drives my thinking it’s just the illogical nature of the swap.”

Some members of Bergdahl’s platoon have criticized him, labeling Bergdahl a deserter.

“I was pissed off then, and I am even more so now with everything going on,” former Sgt. Matt Vierkant, a member of Bergdahl’s platoon when he went missing on June 30, 2009, told CNN last year. “Bowe Bergdahl deserted during a time of war, and his fellow Americans lost their lives searching for him.”

Bergdahl was freed in May when President Barack Obama agreed to swap five Taliban prisoners who had been detained in Guantanamo Bay to secure Bergdahl’s freedom, sending those detainees to Qatar.

Obama announced Bergdahl’s release to fanfare in the White House Rose Garden, flanked by the Army sergeant’s parents, Bob and Jani Bergdahl. His hometown of Hailey, Idaho, had planned a parade to celebrate Bergdahl’s homecoming but later canceled that celebration amid security concerns stemming from the unanswered questions surrounding his disappearance and the resulting controversy over his release.

After returning to the United States, Bergdahl had been on active duty at an administrative job at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, Texas. There, the Army assigned Bergdahl a “sponsor” to help him adjust to life in his new post. Upon returning, Bergdahl refused to meet with his parents — and months later, Army officials had said he was communicating with them but still had not met them face to face.

The five figures the United States exchanged to secure Bergdahl’s release were Khair Ulla Said Wali Khairkhwa, Mullah Mohammad Fazl, Mullah Norullah Nori, Abdul Haq Wasiq and Mohammad Nabi Omari. They were mostly mid- to high-level officials in the Taliban regime and had been detained early in the war in Afghanistan because of their positions within the Taliban, not because of ties to al Qaeda.

The detainee swap for Bergdahl has become increasingly controversial in recent weeks after a report published by the office of Director of National Intelligence James Clapper said one of the 17 intelligence agencies operating under its umbrella had judged that a prisoner released in the exchange had since contacted the Taliban.

Germanwings-crashes-in-French-Alps

Germanwings plane 4U 9525 crashes in French Alps – no survivors

A Germanwings plane 4U 9525 crashes in French Alps has crashed in the French Alps on its way from Barcelona to Duesseldorf.
The Airbus A320 – flight 4U 9525 – went down between Digne and Barcelonnette. There are no survivors, officials say.
The “black box” flight recorder has been found, France’s interior minister says. The cause of the crash is not known and the plane sent no distress signal during an eight-minute descent.
Among the passengers were 16 German pupils returning from an exchange trip.
Germanwings, a low-cost airline owned by Germany’s main carrier Lufthansa, has an excellent safety record. French, Spanish and German leaders have expressed shock.
A recovery team reached the site, in a remote mountain ravine, earlier on Tuesday. Their work was called off in the evening and will resume at first light on Wednesday, the French interior ministry said.
Bruce Robin, a prosecutor from Marseille, told the Reuters news agency that he had seen the wreckage of the aircraft from a helicopter.
“The body of the plane is in a state of destruction, there is not one intact piece of wing or fuselage,” he said.
German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier was also flown over the crash site and described it as “a picture of horror”, the Associated Press news agency says.
Officials believe 67 of those aboard the plane were German citizens. Forty-five of the passengers had Spanish names, Spain’s deputy prime minister said.
The passengers included a German school class on its way back from an exchange trip as well as two opera singers, Maria Radner and Oleg Bryjak.
Ms Radner was travelling with her husband and baby.
The flight was also carrying citizens of Australia, Turkey, Denmark, the Netherlands and Belgium. UK Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond said it was “sadly likely” that some British nationals were on board.
Sandrine Boisse, a tourism official from the ski resort of Pra Loup, told the BBC that she believed she had heard a strange noise in the mountains at around 11:00 (10:00 GMT).
“At first we thought it was on the ski slopes, an avalanche, but it wasn’t the same noise,” she said.
line
Analysis: Richard Westcott, BBC Transport correspondent
We know the aircraft went from a normal cruising height of 38,000 feet to crashing in the mountains in just eight minutes. One pilot told me that is twice the normal descent rate, but he also said that the aircraft is capable of coming down even more quickly and still being okay.
In an emergency, the pilots’ first priority is to fly the plane, but as soon as they have some control they are trained to make an emergency call. That didn’t appear to happen in this case, which suggests the pilots were coping with something so catastrophic they never had time to radio in a mayday, or turn to find the nearest runway.
It’s still too early to know anything for certain, but that might point to both engines failing, a fuel problem or something critical breaking off the aircraft.
The plane began descending one minute after it reached its cruising height and continued to lose altitude for eight minutes, Germanwings managing director Thomas Winkelmann told reporters.
He said the aircraft lost contact with French air traffic controllers at 10:53 at an altitude of about 6,000 feet.
The plane did not send out a distress signal, officials said. Earlier reports of a distress call, quoting the French interior ministry, referred to a message from controllers on the ground.
The White House has said there is no evidence so far of a terror attack. A Lufthansa official said they were assuming for the time being that the crash had been caused by an accident.
The Airbus A320 is a single-aisle passenger jet popular for short- and medium-haul flights.

Starbucks-ends-Race-Together-coffee-cup-campaign

Starbucks ends ‘Race Together’ coffee cup campaign, continues push for forums and new stores

The water got too hot for Starbucks’ ill-defined race crusade.

The java giant is pulling the plug on its controversial “Race Together” campaign, according to a company memo from CEO Howard Schultz.

Baristas were no longer to write “Race Together” on customers’ cups starting Sunday, concluding the most visible part of the company’s diversity and racial equality campaign.

The unorthodox marketing move was supposed to turn the coffee corporation’s stores into impromptu forums for racial dialogues, but even Starbucks staffers seemed confused by it.

Many said they barely had enough time to fill out orders and were never briefed about the campaign before it was launched, the Daily News reported last week.

“While there has been criticism of the initiative — and I know this hasn’t been easy for any of you — let me assure you that we didn’t expect universal praise,” Schultz said Sunday.

Starbucks Chief Executive Howard Schultz speaks during the company’s annual shareholder’s meeting in Seattle, Washington March 18, 2015. Starbucks Corp will begin offering delivery in New York City and Seattle later this year, when it also plans to expand mobile order and pay services across the United States.

Starbucks has no plans to stop other parts of the initiative, including forums and the hiring of 10,000 employees from diverse backgrounds to man new coffee shops in disadvantaged urban areas.

The race crusade was largely panned by employees after it was launched Monday. Some baristas were reluctant to use their stickers during busy shifts, or were just uncomfortable diving into their personal opinions.

The marketing campaign’s backlash included sarcastic tweets revolving around the #RaceTogether hashtag, but the corporation’s intentions did earn support from one community leader in St. Louis, Missouri. Alderman Antonio French, who has remained vocal on ending racial tensions since the shooting death of Michael Brown, applauded the move.
Starbucks Will Stop Writing ‘Race Together’ on Coffee Cups
“The scale of the attempt alone is worth praise,” French tweeted Saturday.

Schultz maintained the campaign was designed to make sure that “the promise of the American Dream should be available to every person in this country, not just a select few.”

police shooting ruins lives

In 2.5 seconds, police shooting ruins lives

In 2.5 seconds, police shooting ruins lives
Marisol Bello, USA TODAY1:44 p.m. EDT March 22, 2015

In 2.5 seconds, police shooting ruins lives - Headline News Guru
In 2.5 seconds, police shooting ruins lives – Headline News Guru

Two-and-a-half seconds for West Valley City, Utah, police detective Shaun Cowley to assess what he perceived as a threat, pull his 9mm Glock pistol from his holster and fire two shots.

Two-and-a-half seconds for one of the bullets to pierce a driver’s side car window and enter the left side of Danielle Willard’s skull.

Two-and-a-half seconds to take Willard’s life.

Two-and-a-half seconds that changed Cowley’s life.

“The shooting cost me everything,” Cowley says. “You make a split-second decision about whether you go home that day and someone else does not. That’s a heavy burden.”

In the national conversation over police use of deadly force, prompted by fatal shootings of unarmed people, the impact on officers who have killed in the line of duty and the people connected to those who have died is haunting. For them, the issue goes beyond protests, social media outrage and hours of news coverage.

Former West Valley City police detective Shaun Cowley speaks with the news media after his case of manslaughter was dismissed in Salt Lake City on Oct. 9, 2014. (Photo: Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News)

Cowley, born into a law enforcement family and a nine-year member of the West Valley City police force, says his instinctive reaction was to protect himself and his partner. He says he shot Willard because he thought she would run him over in her Subaru Forester. The decision led to criminal charges, uncertainty and financial ruin that left his name tarnished and his spirit weakened.

For the family of Danielle Willard, the fatal shooting left confusion, anger and profound sadness over the loss of the 21-year-old brunette with the sunny smile and jokey disposition.

“It’s been a tough few-plus years,” says Willard’s mother, Melissa Kennedy. “We are still so terribly hurt and confused.”

Police use of deadly force has been under a national microscope since officer Darren Wilson, who has since resigned, shot and killed unarmed black man Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., and officer Daniel Pantaleo killed unarmed black man Eric Garner with a chokehold in Staten Island, N.Y. Grand juries declined to bring charges against the white officers.

There is no complete data on the number of people killed by police every year. FBI statistics show at least 400 deadly police shootings reported annually by local police departments. The number is based on what researchers, scholars and advocates consider to be flawed and largely incomplete data based on voluntary reporting.
USA TODAY

Police killings highest in two decades
The recent high-profile deaths raised questions about improving training for police to de-escalate tense situations and to look at biases police may harbor against particular groups, especially black men.

In Cowley’s case, race is not an issue. He is white; so was Willard. Still, the case provides a glimpse into the chaotic moments and perceived threats that push an officer to use deadly force. It also shows the impact of such a quick decision, not just on those immediately involved but also on the wider community.

On Nov. 2, 2012, Cowley, 34, had been part of the narcotics unit at the West Valley City Police Department for two years. He was one of six detectives working on heroin and meth dealing in the Salt Lake City suburb of 135,000 people.

“We were very busy,” he says. “Drugs are so rampant. It’s just crazy.”

On this Friday, he was more than a week into surveillance of a duplex on the east side of the city where a white supremacist gang was suspected of selling heroin and guns.

The following description of that day is based on interviews with Cowley, a report by the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office, which investigated the case, and a judge’s written order:

Cowley was in an unmarked car on one side of the house. His partner, Kevin Salmon, was in an unmarked car in the parking lot of an apartment complex across the street.

After 45 minutes of sitting and watching, Salmon radioed that a silver Subaru had pulled into the parking lot. Both detectives saw a man come out of the house, walk to the car and get in. Cowley says the man, one of the suspected dealers, was in the car for about 30 seconds, then went back inside the house.

The woman driving the car pulled out of her parking spot and parked closer to Salmon in the same lot. When she apparently noticed Salmon looking at her, she moved her car to another spot.

By this time, Cowley had parked closer to see what the woman was doing. He says he suspected the exchange was a drug sale and wanted to talk with the woman.

At this point, the stop would have been routine, he says. If the detectives found drugs on her, Cowley says, they wanted her to help them get evidence against the suspected dealers.

Cowley says he walked up to the car on the driver’s side while Salmon approached on the passenger side.

“She immediately looks up and I see her put something in her mouth,” he says. “We believed she was trying to ingest heroin.

“Now, she’s escalated this,” he says. So he pulled his gun from the holster and pointed it at the woman.

“Get out of the car,” Cowley yelled. She ignored him, he says. Her doors were locked, her windows were up and the car was running.

Both detectives told investigators that Willard moved her hand over the gear shift and looked as if she was preparing to back up and flee. Salmon told investigators he tried to break a window in the car but couldn’t.

Less than a minute had passed. Cowley decided to go to his car for a crowbar to break the window. He says the situation was taking longer than they had anticipated. They wanted to get a handle on it before anyone in the house noticed something amiss.

Cowley says he re-holstered his gun and was walking toward his car when he heard a screech of tires.

“I see her vehicle flying at me in reverse,” he says. He couldn’t see his partner and thought she had hit Salmon.

“I think he’s dead,” he says. “My brain is going, ‘You are going to die. She’s coming at you fast …’ All I see is the back windshield coming at me faster than anything I could imagine.”

He doesn’t remember making the decision to grab his gun. He doesn’t remember grabbing it. But he remembers firing it. He remembers the only sound he heard was the roar of the rounds going off and seeing one of the windows of the car shatter.

Then he passed out for what he thinks was a second, maybe two.

He came to on the ground on his stomach. A black mark stained one of his knees. His right knee throbbed in pain. He says he was hit by the car, but a later reconstruction of the incident found that was unlikely because of the direction the car was moving and where he was standing. He watched as the driver reversed the car in a tight arc and crashed into another car.

Willard would be pronounced dead at the scene.

West Valley City police officer Shawn Cowley is taken to an ambulance by paramedics after an officer-involved shooting on Nov. 2, 2012. (Photo: Scott G. Winterton, Deseret News)

After the shooting, the department put Cowley and Salmon on paid administrative leave.

Cowley remained in limbo as Salt Lake District Attorney Sim Gill investigated.

In August 2013, nine months after the shooting, Gill released a report saying the shooting was not justified.

In his report, Gill disputed Cowley’s and Salmon’s version of the incident. He said a reconstruction showed that neither Cowley nor Salmon was in the path of the car as Willard put it in reverse. The reconstruction showed her tires were turned in such a way as to show that her car was not a threat to either officer, he said.

He also disputed Cowley’s statement that Willard had swallowed a black substance the detective thought was drugs. An autopsy found no drugs in Willard’s system. A small bag of heroin was found in the pocket of the driver’s door.

It would take another 10 months before Gill charged Cowley with manslaughter. Gill did not return repeated calls or e-mails to discuss the case.

The aftermath of the shooting reverberated through this blue-collar Mormon community.

Police investigating the shooting found sealed evidence from a previous case in the trunk of Cowley’s car, evidence he had never logged or stored properly.

That discovery created a cascade of problems that roiled the West Valley City Police Department. It led to an internal audit of the narcotics unit that found mishandling of evidence and accusations of stolen drugs and missing money. No officers have been charged, but the findings raised questions of possible corruption and about the chain of custody for evidence. As a result, prosecutors tossed out at least 100 drug cases filed by the unit.

The narcotics unit was disbanded. Longtime Police Chief Buzz Nielsen resigned for what he said were health reasons.

The new chief, Lee Russo, says the shooting was a “flashpoint” for the police department because it forced the 206-member force to look at its policies and culture.

“It was the moment that brought the department to a grinding halt,” he says. The department released little information to the public about the shooting or the problems within the narcotics unit, which led to more distrust and accusations, he says.

Russo says he took over a department in August 2013 where the officers were demoralized and their every action came under scrutiny.

Since then, he has established regular audits of every division within the department to ensure that evidence is cataloged properly. He instituted monthly meetings with residents and community leaders, and bought body cameras for every officer to record encounters with the public.

He is creating a new narcotics unit that is training with the Salt Lake City office of the federal Drug Enforcement Administration.

“We are a completely different agency than we were,” he says.

Under Russo, the department fired Cowley for mishandling evidence. Russo says Cowley lost or misplaced evidence in at least four cases, including money that amounted to at least $2,000.

“You have a police officer who loses drugs and money,” Russo says. “Is that the kind of police officer you want in the community?”

Cowley and his attorneys deny the chief’s claim. They say he did nothing wrong and that he was a scapegoat for problems within the narcotics unit. His attorney Lindsay Jarvis says investigators removed the contents in Cowley’s car and locker during the investigation, and it was they who failed to properly log into evidence the items found during the search.

The two sides are in a tense battle over Cowley’s efforts to rejoin the force.

He says the uncertainty over his fate wore on him. He lost 30 pounds and became distant at home with his wife and two children. He never wanted to leave the house.

“It was so stressful and lonely,” he says. “I was on my own. You hear and read all the negative comments about you.”

The preliminary hearing into Cowley’s case in October 2014 lasted three days. At the end, Third District Judge L.A. Dever dismissed the case, saying the evidence did not show that Cowley acted recklessly when he shot Willard or that the shooting was not justified.

Former West Valley City police officer Shaun Cowley listens to the ruling by Judge L.A. Dever who announces Oct. 9, 2014, that he will not have to stand trial. Cowley was charged with second-degree felony manslaughter in connection with the Nov. 2, 2012, fatal shooting of 21-year-old Danielle Willard. At right are defense attorneys Paul Cassell and Lindsay Jarvis. (Photo: Francisco Kjolseth, The Deseret News)

Willard’s family, who had been hopeful that the man who killed their daughter would be tried and convicted, were in shock.

Her parents call her shooting an assassination.

Two years after her oldest child’s death, Willard’s mother, who lives in Washington state, is still trying to make sense of it.

Willard had gone to Utah to kick her heroin habit, Kennedy says. She had started using heroin with friends when she was 18, and she had been in and out of 30-day drug treatment programs near her home in Vancouver, Wash.

Her mother thought that if she was in a longer program away from her friends, she could finally be free of heroin. They found a 90-day treatment program near Salt Lake City.

Willard had completed it by the time of her death. Kennedy says she was working as a gas station cashier and was moving from her apartment to another. She was supposed to have been putting a rent deposit on the new apartment at the time she was killed.

“She was doing good,” Kennedy says. “She was really trying.”

The family filed a wrongful death suit against the city, which they settled in February for $1.4 million. The city did not admit wrongdoing, and under the condition of the settlement, Kennedy says she “can’t say anything bad about the police.”

She says now she can focus her attention on changing police policies to make officers more accountable when they use deadly force.

“They feel they have a right to go out and pull the trigger and not pay for what they’ve done,” she says. “I want them to have another reason other than ‘I was scared for my life.’ If you feel threatened, then seek safety. If you think a car is running at you, get out of the way. Why would you pull your gun out and shoot?”

Cowley says he had no choice, but the decision cost him his life as he knew it.

“I was unemployable,” he says. “My name was so much in the media here.”

After he was charged, the only job he could get was laying hardwood floors with a relative. He made so little money that he and his wife of 15 years could no longer afford the rent on their house.

She moved into the basement of her parents’ home with their two young children. He moved into the basement of his parents’ home.

The couple decided last summer to legally separate.

“It happened bit by bit,” he says. “We grew apart.”

Today, he works with another relative repairing medical equipment. He is appealing to get his job back. He is still in the basement of his parent’s house.

As Cowley tries now to repair a life left in shambles, he lives with the burden of everything two people lost in 2.5 seconds. A Washington man was gunned down by police after throwing rocks at them. His family questions why deadly force was necessary. VPC

complete auto protection

Red Auto Protection’s “Dealer Connect” Program Captures the Attention of Major U.S. Auto Dealerships and Receives Top Honors by Headline News

Red Auto Protection’s “Dealer Connect” Program Captures the Attention of Major U.S. Auto Dealerships and Receives Top Honors by Headline News

Information contained on this page is provided by an independent third-party content provider. WorldNow and this Station make no warranties or representations in connection therewith. If you have any questions or comments about this page please contactpressreleases@worldnow.com.

SOURCE Headline News Guru

NEW YORK, March 18, 2015 /PRNewswire/ — HeadlineNews.Guru – Red Auto Protection officially launches their “Dealer Connect” to dealerships across the country and sparks immediate demand.

Logo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150317/182316LOGO
Photo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150317/182315

Red Auto’s dealer connect program gives auto dealers the ability to remarket and build customer loyalty at no cost.  This is done by utilizing professional and well-trained sales agents, mixed with state of the art technology. The program is backed by one of the leading and most reputable providers in the United States.

With Red Auto Dealers Connect portal, dealerships can log in to this easy to use program and monitor their customers’ sales, services, have their customers called upon for necessary oil changes, maintenance, and offer extended warranty coverage for the current vehicle.

According to Red Auto Protection’s CMO Trevor Smith, “Only about 20% of the used vehicles sold at dealerships actually buy vehicle protection, this is not because the policy is bad, but because the salesman is trained to sell cars not explain the benefits of auto protection policies. This standard practice among dealerships is literally leaving hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost revenues for dealerships, agents, administrators, and more importantly, it’s leaving hundreds of thousands of customers without a protection plan.

Bob Youbanker, Sales manager from Newport Beach Lexus says, “Red Auto Protection has A+ Better Business Bureau rating and is Rip Off Report verified, and they use administrators that actually pay their claims, they are in a class all of their own.”

For dealerships it appears to be a win-win relationship in that they get to remarket to a customer base that for all intents and purposes, is often lost to a competitor; the best part is, it’s completely free to the dealership.

Better quality automobiles and their increased maintenance complexity and costs has led to Red Auto Protection’s newest dealer connect program. According to corporate executives, this program has been in development for a couple years and their enthusiasm about the program and the revolutionary program is transparent through their interviews.

IJR NEWS (Headlinenews.guru) spoke to Drew Edward Gilkey from Warranty Quote, who said, “Being a division of Red Auto Protection has been a great experience and honor. As their media correspondence leader, we have discovered along the way that they are a company that stands behind their product and takes care of their customers. This type of customer service is nice to see in this day and age, let’s eat.”

Red Auto Protection’s CEO, Elijah Norton, was also interviewed and said, “It’s pretty simple, many companies forget about the value of standing behind a product and the value of relationships with dealerships. We don’t, we select the top dealerships and match them with qualified and well-trained auto protection agents to tackle their remarketing needs and open great revenue streams. This program puts an awesome product in the control of a customer that, in the event of a breakdown, their budgets and livelihoods are protected.”

To learn more about Dealer Connect, call (877)-580-7750 or www.warrantyquote.net

Headline News Guru
Editor In Chief – CJ Green
657 222 7074

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/red-auto-protections-dealer-connect-program-captures-the-attention-of-major-us-auto-dealerships-and-receives-top-honors-by-headline-news-300051655.html

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Woman's versus Men's feet

Ladies Versus Men’s Foot Problems

Ladies Versus Men’s Foot Problems – FootSurgon.org

Ladies Feet

Updated 2/2/2015 IJR NEWS

Ladies are a lot more prone to specific foot troubles compared to guys, generally from years of walking in narrow-fitting footwears that press the toes and from high-heels that cramp the forefoot and posture dangers for arc and ankle joint troubles.

Foot and ankle joint issues typically experienced by women:.

Morton’s Neuroma– a thickening of nerve cells in the sphere of the foot resulting from compression and inflammation of the nerve, such as from wearing shoes that have a conical toe box, or high-heeled shoes that cause the toes to be compelled into the toe box.

Bunions– start with a leaning of the huge toe, gradually transforming the angle of the bones for many years and gradually generating the particular bump. They are most commonly triggered by an inherited flawed mechanical structure of the foot. Although both males and females can obtain bunions, the shoes used by ladies in some cases make the deformity get gradually worse.

Heel Pain and Plantar Fasciitis– is usually created by plantar fasciitis, although it might also be because of other reasons. Although faulty foot framework is the most typical source of plantar fasciitis, in females it may result from using non-supportive footwears such as flip-flops and ballet flats.

Ankle Sprain– While any individual could sprain an ankle, women are specifically susceptible to this injury when using high-heeled shoes (particularly on slippery areas), platform-soled footwears, or other improper shoes.

Foot Health Facts for Men.

Men’s feet

Men’s ankles and feet take a whipping, with works that typically require lengthy hours standing or strolling, and pastime including operating and leaping. However men often overlook foot and ankle joint issues up until discomfort begins reducing them down. It’s crucial for males to recognize that discomfort is not typical, and most foot and ankle joint conditions are simpler to deal with when diagnosed early.

Foot and ankle joint issues frequently experienced by men:.

Ankle joint Sprain – Participating in sporting activities tasks is one means men could acquire a sprained ankle joint. However also daily activities such as strolling on an uneven surface or slipping on an icy pavement could produce the agonizing stretching or tearing of the ankle tendon. If an aged strain wasn’t completely rehabilitated, the ankle joint could continuously obtain sprained, leading to persistent ankle weakness.

Hallux Rigidus – While some foot types are a lot more prone to obtain this condition, which is an unpleasant stiffening of the large toe joint, it could also be reason by overuse. Golf enthusiasts could develop it as a result of the motion of the foot throughout the follow-through of the swing, and various other men may have tasks that increase the tension on the big toe, such as those requiring frequent stooping or crouching.

Common Disorders of the Achilles Tendon – Tendonitis and tendonosis of the Achilles tendon are normally induced by an unexpected boost of a recurring task. Engagement in sports, particularly by those who are less conditioned and take part in sports just on weekends, places one at high danger for creating ailments of the Achilles tendon. These problems are additionally common in males whose work places anxiety on their feet and ankle joints, such as workers.

Toe and Metatarsal Fractures (Broken toes) – Some individuals state that “the physician cannot do anything for a broken bone in the foot.” This is generally not real. In truth, if a broken toe or metatarsal bone is not dealt with properly, serious issues may establish.
Shoe design is the most researched extrinsic factor for foot and ankle injuries in ladies. Research shows, nonetheless, that females’s feet are not just smaller sized variations of guys’s feet.

“Aesthetic prosthetic” by Susan Kingsley.

Understudied differences in foot structure, muscle mass toughness, ligament indifference, and proprioception are all intrinsic aspects that can initiate a predisposition for discomfort and injury in females. Little attention, however, has actually been offered to innate physical distinctions in man and female foot structure.

A research study by Wunderlich and Cavanagh checking out lower limb and foot measurements of approximately 300 guys and 500 women in the U.S. Army concluded that biologic distinctions already existing in between male and female feet and legs. They noted considerable distinctions in arc form, dimension of the lateral side of the foot, terrific toe, and sphere of the foot.

Differences expand beyond the foot.

Based on a report by Fessler and partners, guys have greater foot length-to-body elevation ratios compared to girls. As a result, the differences in foot length in between males and women is typically proportional to stature. Research studies have shown that distinctions in the framework and dimension of the foot bones (specifically by dimensions of metatarsal, phalangeal, calcaneus, and talus bones) have actually permitted forensic recognition of sex.

Along with distinctions in skeletal structure, research studies by Eckstein and associates utilized magnetic vibration imaging to observe differences in cartilage material in between males and women, including quantity, area of the joint, and cartilage material density. Although the initial function of the study was not to identify sex differences, statistically significant disparities were kept in mind. For example, the research study showed that women had a 20 percent to 25 percent lower volume and surface location in the subtalar, talonavicular, and ankle joints and approximately 16 percent thinner cartilage.

Women and men likewise have substantial distinctions in gait. Studies by both Kerrigan and associates and Sepic and associates have actually shown that plantar flexion and array of motion of the ankle are better in women, possibly as a result of better indifference in female tendons. Numerous researches have actually noted greater ankle and knee indifference worths in ladies.

Glass pantofles are for fairytale.
A suitable fitting, comfortable shoe rarely relates to trendy, stylish footwear in a lady’s globe. Unfortunately, the normal, a lot more fashionable high-heeled footwear with a slim toe box creates enhanced plantar tension and toe crowding, which can trigger bunions (hallux valgus), bunionettes, hammer toe, and even neuromas in serious instances.

Research studies show that 88 percent of females put on footwears too small for their feet and 70 percent were noted to have actually connected hallux valgus defect. National research studies reveal roughly 1 percent of all adults have hallux valgus, with an enhancing occurrance with age; although only 9 percent of 30-to- 60-year-olds have bunions, about 16 percent of people more mature than age 60 have them. Females are two to 4 times much more likely to have hallux valgus compared to men, most likely as a result of a combination of inherent architectural features and external shoes options.

In addition, the incidence of hammer toe is 4 to 5 times more typical in females. In 1991, roughly 209,000 bunionectomies, 210 hammer toe improvements, 66,500 neuroma resections, and 119,000 bunionette repair works were carried out.

Badly suitable shoes impact even more than merely feet. Shoes with a heel of 1.5 cents cents or greater boost knee torque with walking, which could be associated with the rise of knee osteoarthritis among females that favor higher-heeled footwears.

Many research studies have actually examined shoes in senior patients at the time of an autumn and have revealed that a high percentage of those which dropped were putting on pantofles. The extreme versatility of sandals and their absence of security are connected with a greater incidence of tripping and falls.


We have a long method to enter checking out innate differences in between the female and male foot. Limited study has been released on sex-related dimorphism of the foot and ankle joint; several of the researches only retrospectively identified structural distinctions to explain injuries unique to ladies. Numerous detectives have actually recommended that proprioceptive differences are somewhat responsible for ankle joint tendon injuries.

As expertise of sexual dimorphism and the one-of-a-kind health care requirements of females development, interferences that are associated with intrinsic differences, and also the extrinsic aspects of the foot and ankle joint, will be crucial to supply proper precautionary and restorative look after ladies.

Judith F. Baumhauer, MD, is instructor of orthopaedic surgical procedure at the University of Rochester School of Medicine. She can be reached at judy_baumhauer@urmc.rochester.edu.

Shoe style is the most researched extrinsic element for foot and ankle joint injuries in women. Research shows, nevertheless, that ladies’s feet are not simply smaller sized variations of males’s feet.

A research study by Wunderlich and Cavanagh examining lower arm or leg and foot measurements of around 300 men and 500 ladies in the U.S. Army concluded that biologic distinctions existed in between man and female feet and legs. They noted significant distinctions in arc shape, dimension of the lateral side of the foot, wonderful toe, and round of the foot. Restricted study has actually been posted on sexual dimorphism of the foot and ankle; many of the research studies simply retrospectively identified anatomic differences to describe injuries unique to females.