Pittsburgh residents get ready for driverless Uber cars

Pittsburgh residents get ready for driverless Uber cars

Brian FungThe Washington Post

Very soon, residents of this hilly city will become the first Americans to test out Uber‘s self-driving car service.

It is a historic moment not just for the ride-hailing company, but also for robotic cars in general. For many people, the technology will finally become a reality, one they can touch and experience rather than just read about.

Uber has been conducting its driverless-car tests on open roads since May. People in Pittsburgh say they have often seen the company’s prototypes driving around the city, their rooftops laden with sensors and communications equipment. But the project otherwise has been shrouded in secrecy, even from the drivers who sometimes ferry Uber employees to work in the Strip District.

Hence, what Pittsburgh locals think about Uber’s driverless cars has been shaped mostly by what they have observed with their own eyes. And their reactions run the gamut, from hope that the new technology will contribute to their city’s story of renewal, to questions about the cars’ performance on Pittsburgh’s complicated road network, to concerns about how the vehicles will affect the overall economy.

uber-referral-code5Most of all, interviews with city residents reveal a reluctance to trust a technology that Uber has kept so close to the chest.

“It’s scary, being driven by a robot,” Ada Gana said. “A person who’s driving knows what he’s doing or where he’s going. That gives me confidence.”

The San Francisco company staffs each of its driverless cars with two full-time employees, one to grasp the wheel and another to keep an eye on the computer software. That will not change when the company debuts its driverless service. But not everyone knows that. Some believed the cars would be empty, which suggests Uber has a lot of educating to do.

That is particularly the case for seniors, said Eva Tsuquiashi-Daddesio, 67. “If Uber or other companies want to be successful with the older population, they need to do a lot of demonstrations. Talk is not going to do anything,” she said. Seniors “have to see other people like them — like us, I suppose — using it, and they will have to see that it is safe.”

Even some younger people say they would be hesitant to try a self-driving Uber, although some predict that university students here will be among the most eager adopters.

For Uber drivers, however, it is no surprise that employment is the bigger concern.

Michelle Garrison has four children and treats driving for Uber as a full-time job. She wakes up at 5:15 a.m., Monday through Friday, and does not stop picking up passengers until 6 in the evening.

“I personally don’t care for it,” she said of the testing of self-driving cars. “I think it’s going to take jobs away from some of us. It’s going to take away from the actual drivers that are out here that are putting in the time and the hours.”

Uber’s chief executive, Travis Kalanick, has said that he does not expect the number of human drivers to decline anytime soon and that self-driving technology will create jobs, such as for fleet maintenance.

That is not enough to alleviate some Uber drivers’ worries. A few have signed on with a group called Cabbie Central, a Pittsburgh organization that represents nearly 250 people who drive for taxi and, increasingly, ride-hailing services. Although they compete intensely for the same customers, taxi drivers and Uber drivers are discovering they have much in common in the face of Uber’s automation experiments, said Jim Jacobs, the general manager of Cabbie Central and a taxi driver who has been in the business for 11 years.

Uber’s aggressive timetable in launching an autonomous service has led many of its drivers to grapple with an uncomfortable reality much sooner than expected, said Jacobs: This is what planned obsolescence really looks like.

Some who view their gig with Uber as a part-time or temporary job are not as worried. “It hasn’t affected me yet, and I’m not career-sold on doing this forever,” said Jason Renton, a driver who lives half an hour from downtown Pittsburgh. “So no, it doesn’t really bother me.”

He and other drivers say that 70% to 95% of their customers are skeptical of the technology.

There are still a lot of questions. Some residents worry about the ability of a self-driving car to successfully navigate to a rider’s location or to avoid sudden road closures. Pittsburgh is said to be a tough — as in “good” — test case for self-driving vehicles because the city has hills, bridges and older streets.

On Sept. 2, a construction accident on the Liberty Bridge caused a fire so hot, it melted part of the bridge’s support structure. The bridge has been closed for weeks, causing commuter headaches. But Uber’s navigation system did not appear to know about the closure, said Shiquita Crumbley, a Pittsburgh native who started driving for Uber a few months ago.

“GPSes are not always correct,” she said. “It might take you to this bridge, not necessarily knowing, hey, this bridge is not open, you can’t go on it. So just making sure it’s the most updated version — that’s going to be the biggest, biggest thing for everyone’s safety.”

For the foreseeable future, navigation may not be a big issue for the self-driving cars, as the Uber employee behind the wheel can always take over.

Local transportation activists say they support Uber’s effort. “People are bad at driving,” said Scott Bricker, executive director of the bicycling advocacy group Bike Pittsburgh. “Recently, a Pittsburgh bicyclist posted video of a self-driving Uber test car giving him space and passing at a slower speed in contrast to a car driven by a person…. If you ask me, taking the human factor out of driving can’t happen fast enough.”

Other local residents say the program helps put Pittsburgh on the map. In recent years, an influx of new money has brought tremendous growth for the former industrial powerhouse, reversing decades of decline.

“A lot of people have regional pride in the universities, big companies like Uber and Google being here,” said Hassan Khan, a doctoral student at Carnegie Mellon University. Uber’s self-driving program, he said, “fits that narrative of Pittsburgh being a resurgent city through tech, through medicine.”

Livermore Police & 7 officers criminally charged in Bay Area police sex scandal, D.A. says

7 officers to be criminally charged in Bay Area police sex scandal, D.A. says

James Queally and Cindy Chang

Seven Bay Area law enforcement officers will be charged with sex offenses and other crimes in a scandal that has rocked the Oakland Police Department, threatening its hopes of ending 13 years of federal oversight and causing a major shake-up in its command staff.

The plan to charge the officers was announced Friday by Alameda County Dist. Atty. Nancy E. O’Malley, who said she could not file the charges until the teenage woman at the center of the scandal returns to California after being sent to a rehabilitation program in Florida by another agency.

“Anyone, particularly in a position of authority, who engages in sexual exploitation or inappropriate sexual conduct with a minor or a young adult will be held accountable if we have the evidence,” O’Malley said. “It doesn’t matter if they’re a police officer, a doctor, a probation officer, or a lawyer or a judge.”

Two law enforcement officers — Giovani LoVerde of the Oakland Police Department and Ricardo Perez, who has resigned from the Contra Costa County Sheriff’s Department — will be charged with felony oral copulation with a minor, O’Malley said. Perez will also be charged with two counts of engaging in a lewd act.

Four other Oakland police officers will be prosecuted: Brian Bunton, on charges of felony obstruction of justice and engaging in an act of prostitution; Warit Utappa and Tyrell Smith, who allegedly searched a criminal justice computer system without an authorized purpose; and LeRoy Johnson, on charges of failing to report sexual misconduct against a minor.

Johnson has retired and Smith has resigned from the department.

Dan Black, who has retired from the Livermore Police Department, will be charged with two counts of engaging in an act of prostitution and two counts of a lewd act in a public place.

The alleged sexual offenses do not appear to have occurred while the officers were on duty, O’Malley said.

The officers could not immediately be reached for comment.

Earlier this year, Contra Costa County prosecutors declined to charge Smith after he had been accused of attempting to forcibly sodomize the woman. O’Malley said she believes Smith and Utappa had sexual contact with the woman in Contra Costa County, but her office has no jurisdiction outside of Alameda County.

In a television news interview in June, the 19-year-old Richmond woman claimed she had sex with more than a dozen Oakland police officers. Some of the encounters happened in exchange for information about planned prostitution raids, the woman has alleged, and others occurred when she was underage.

The scandal soon widened, as the woman claimed she also had had sex or other inappropriate contact with officers from other police agencies.

The woman’s name has been widely reported, but the Los Angeles Times has not published her identity because she may be a sex crime victim.

Some officers who engaged in “sexting” with the woman cannot be prosecuted because the victim was not underage, said O’Malley, who characterized the online activity as “sexually explicit or inappropriate chatter.”

O’Malley said that many police officers who were “friends” with the woman on Facebook had never met her in person, including Oakland police Officer Brendan O’Brien, whose suicide in September 2015 caused the city’s internal affairs unit to begin digging into the scandal. The woman has said in numerous interviews that she met O’Brien along International Boulevard when he saved her from an attack by a boyfriend or pimp.

O’Malley repeatedly stressed that those linked to the scandal did not represent the larger Oakland Police Department.

The actions of a few have really shone a very negative light on all of the hardworking men and women who come to work every day as police officers to protect our community,” O’Malley said.

Barry Donelan, president of the Oakland Police Officers’ Assn., also emphasized that the vast majority of his colleagues were not involved in the scandal.

“Our officers are just as disappointed as everyone else in the blemish these events have made on the reputations of Oakland police officers who come to work every day and serve with honor in our community,” Donelan said in a written statement.

The decision to file charges was made public days after Oakland’s mayor announced that the city would fire four officers and suspend seven others without pay in connection with the scandal.

Local activists said O’Malley’s decision to prosecute might lead other victims of police misconduct to step forward and help flush bad officers out of the agency.

O’Malley showed “real leadership” in choosing to prosecute, but every officer implicated in the scandal should be forced out of the department, said Kenyatta Carter, a 37-year-old Oakland native and activist who founded Victims Of The System, a group that helps people bring grievances against state and city agencies.

“These officers should not be allowed to remain suspended and come back,” Carter said. “Training is not enough if you knew about what was going on with a minor, or sexting.… That’s unacceptable. Period.”

Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf said Friday that she hoped the announcement of the charges would make clear that city officials are committed to eliminating a small group of officers who committed “disgusting misconduct.” Asked about calls to fire, rather than simply suspend, some of the officers connected to the scandal, Schaaf said the city attorney’s office and Oakland police internal affairs investigators were hamstrung by when and where some of the alleged misdeeds occurred.

“This case is complicated because most of the misconduct occurred off-duty,” she said in a telephone interview. “Not all of it — certainly, the improper use of databases was done on duty — but that should be taken into consideration.”

She said she could not comment on LoVerde’s, Bunton’s or Utappa’s status with the city police department.

O’Malley said her office had uncovered evidence of additional misconduct in several other jurisdictions, including the city of San Francisco, as well as San Joaquin and Contra Costa counties. On Thursday, Contra Costa County Chief Dist. Atty.  Doug McMaster told The Times that his office had not been presented with any prosecutable cases in connection with the scandal.

McMaster previously told The Times that the woman at the center of the case was sent to Florida with funds from a state victims’ advocacy program. He scoffed at the idea that she was “spirited away” to keep her from testifying. Calls to McMaster seeking additional comment Friday were not immediately returned.

On Aug. 29, the woman was arrested and charged with aggravated battery in Florida after she bit a security guard at the rehabilitation facility in Stuart, Fla., according to an arrest report filed by the Martin County Sheriff’s Office.

Police were called to the facility after the woman became physically combative with several staff members. In interviews with sheriff’s deputies, she repeatedly discussed her past drug abuse and sexual encounters with police officers and later attempted to solicit sex from the deputies, according to the report.

An attorney representing the woman could not be reached for comment.

John Burris, the civil rights attorney who negotiated a legal settlement that placed Oakland under a federal monitor in 2003, said the woman’s arrest in Florida, coupled with O’Malley’s investigation poking holes in some of her narrative, could allow the officers’ attorneys to attack her credibility at trial.

The sex scandal grew in scope after Oakland Police Chief Sean Whent, who had been credited with bringing the department out of the shadow of the 2003 brutality scandal that led to the implementation of a federal monitor, resigned the same weekend the woman’s TV news interview aired.

Whent’s successor stepped down within days, as did the next police chief. The department is now run by a civilian city administrator.

Schaaf, the city’s mayor, said she will focus her attention on helping heal the widening rift between police and citizens, adding that she remained hopeful Oakland could attract a progressive, reform-minded candidate to fill the vacant chief’s post.

“No doubt this scandal has shaken not just community trust, but the forward momentum that this department was feeling,” Schaaf said. “But I have every confidence that we will move forward.”

Ann Steinfeld Physical Therapy CHAMPIONS AlternativeS TO COMBAT Rising OpioiD EPIDEMIC

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Edan Devora

info@annsteinfeldpt.com

(714) 556-2600

 

Ann Steinfeld Physical Therapy CHAMPIONS

AlternativeS TO COMBAT Rising OpioiD EPIDEMIC

Leading Orange County Physical Therapy Clinic Promotes Holistic Approach to Pain Management

 

(Headline News Guru Original Story by Jules Hermes – Permission to repost within journalism ethics and standards) COSTA MESA, CA — June 2, 2016 – With the alleged prescription drug-related death of Prince, the U.S. is once again forced to examine the staggering statistics that indicate a country in crisis. No longer confined to one particular stereotype, prescription and illicit drug abuse has infiltrated every socioeconomic class, affecting every race and age group, from young adults to senior citizens. To help spread the message that conservative, non drug approaches can effectively manage pain, Ann Steinfeld Physical Therapy – a leading Orange County, Calif. physical therapy practice specializing in sports medicine, orthopedics, geriatrics and neurology – has joined others in the federal, state, local and private sectors to address the prescription drug abuse and heroin epidemic. Advocating for a multidisciplinary clinical approach—including physical therapists serving on the care team alongside physicians and other healthcare providers—Ann Steinfeld, the clinic’s founder and CEO, is among a consortium of therapists committed to holistically improving the quality of life for patients with acute and chronic pain.

“There is no doubt that physical therapy as a first-line treatment for chronic pain can be as effective as—and safer than—prescription drug therapy,” say Steinfeld who founded her practice in Costa Mesa in 2001. “In response to the alarming rate of opioid abuse, the recently released Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for prescribing opioids delivers a clear message that echoes what we physical therapists have known for decades: there are better, safer ways to treat chronic pain than the use of opioids.”

The American Academy of Pain Medicine reports that 100 million Americans suffer from chronic pain, exceeding diabetes, heart disease and cancer conditions combined. According to the CDC, physicians wrote 259 million opioid prescriptions in 2012, which translates to one bottle of pills per American adult. An individualized physical therapy plan, however, aims to reduce a patient’s pain and associated disability, improve function, and promote health and well being without the use of drugs. Through a comprehensive evaluation, physical therapists can address chronic pain with a combination of movement exercises, manual therapy, and education about pain science, body alignment and movement, all of which contribute to understanding the underlying cause of pain.

Ann Steinfeld Physical Therapy has made great strides in the advancement of techniques that go beyond rehabilitating athletes and assisting those who have undergone surgery or sustained injuries from an accident. With the capacity to incorporate hands-on manual therapy methods with state-of-the-art equipment, as well as massage therapy, patients of all ages and walks of life not only experience remarkable results but also develop strategies to manage their own long-term health goals. Through individualized comprehensive plans executed by some of Orange County’s top therapists who provide the highest caliber of care and focused attention to patient concerns, Ann Steinfeld expedites the healing process with cost-effective and drug-free alternatives to alleviate pain, and imparts long-lasting preventive solutions to ensure optimal health for the present and well into the future.

Addiction to opioids is not a new phenomenon, but it has escalated to new proportions. The number of Americans dying each year from drug overdoses has surpassed that of motor vehicle crashes. More than half of patients prescribed opioids for chronic pain continue to take the painkillers five years later, according to a 2011 study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. In fact, a staggering four in five new heroin users started out misusing prescription painkillers, according to a National Center for Health Statistics Data Brief. A key initiative of the APTA and 40 provider groups over the next two years is a collective messaging campaign to reach more than 4 million healthcare providers regarding opioid abuse and appropriate prescribing practices.

 

For media-related questions, contact Edan Devora, info@annsteinfeldpt.com or call (714) 556-2600.

For more information regarding Ann Steinfeld Physical Therapy, visit: http://www.annsteinfeldpt.com.

 

ABOUT ANN STEINFELD PHYSICAL THERAPY

Ann SteinfeldAnn Steinfeld Physical Therapy is a privately owned outpatient practice in Orange County, Calif. specializing in the evaluation and treatment of physical injuries and disabilities resulting from a wide range of conditions related to sports and athletics, surgical procedures, occupation, repetitive motion and accidents, as well as those specific to age and gender. Ann Steinfeld’s highly skilled and trained, licensed physical therapists utilize a broad spectrum of the most advanced physical intervention and rehabilitation techniques to alleviate pain, restore mobility, improve balance and coordination, and increase muscular strength and endurance. Referred to by leading physicians throughout Los Angeles and Orange County, Ann Steinfeld provides a comprehensive team approach to ensure successful patient outcomes, while maintaining the highest quality of exceptional one-to-one care in an energetic, positive and ethical environment. For more information visit: www.annsteinfeldpt.com.

 About The Private Practice Section of the American Physical Therapy Association

Founded in 1956, the Private Practice Section of the American Physical Therapy Association champions the success of physical therapist-owned businesses. Our members are leaders and innovators in the health care system. The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) represents more than 85,000 physical therapists, physical therapist assistants and students of physical therapy nationwide. For more information, please visit http://www.ppsapta.org.

 

Author
Jules Hermes
Hermes House Press – A featured Partner of Headline News Guru

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/rr/rr6501e1.htm

Trump reaches critical number to clinch nomination

May 26 at 1:17 PM
WASHINGTON — Donald Trump reached the number of delegates needed to clinch the Republican nomination for president Thursday, completing an unlikely rise that has upended the political landscape and set the stage for a bitter fall campaign.The good news for Trump, reported by The Associated Press after a nationwide survey of unbound delegates, was tempered by continuing problems for his campaign. Those include the abrupt departure of Trump’s political director and continuing resistance by many Republican leaders to declare their support for his upstart candidacy.Trump was put over the top in the AP delegate count by a small number of the party’s unbound delegates who told the AP they would support him at the national convention in July. Among them was Oklahoma GOP chairwoman Pam Pollard.

“I think he has touched a part of our electorate that doesn’t like where our country is,” Pollard said. “I have no problem supporting Mr. Trump.”

It takes 1,237 delegates to win the Republican nomination. Trump has reached 1,238. With 303 delegates at stake in five state primaries on June 7, Trump will easily pad his total, avoiding a contested convention in Cleveland.

Speaker Paul Ryan has backed away from his pledge to support whoever becomes the nominee, saying he’s “not ready” to endorse Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. Other GOP heavyweights, including the Bushes, are also not giving endorsements. (Jenny Starrs/The Washington Post)

Trump, a political neophyte who for years delivered caustic commentary on the state of the nation from the sidelines but had never run for office, fought off 16 other Republican contenders in an often ugly primary race.

Many on the right have been slow to warm to Trump, wary of his conservative bona fides. Others worry about his crass personality and the lewd comments he’s made about women.

But millions of grass-roots activists, many of them outsiders to the political process, have embraced him as a plain-speaking populist.

Steve House, chairman of the Colorado Republican Party and an unbound delegate who confirmed his support of Trump to the AP, said he likes the billionaire’s background as a businessman. “Leadership is leadership,” House said. “If he can surround himself with the political talent, I think he will be fine.”

May 26 at 1:17 PM
WASHINGTON — Donald Trump reached the number of delegates needed to clinch the Republican nomination for president Thursday, completing an unlikely rise that has upended the political landscape and set the stage for a bitter fall campaign.The good news for Trump, reported by The Associated Press after a nationwide survey of unbound delegates, was tempered by continuing problems for his campaign. Those include the abrupt departure of Trump’s political director and continuing resistance by many Republican leaders to declare their support for his upstart candidacy.Trump was put over the top in the AP delegate count by a small number of the party’s unbound delegates who told the AP they would support him at the national convention in July. Among them was Oklahoma GOP chairwoman Pam Pollard.

“I think he has touched a part of our electorate that doesn’t like where our country is,” Pollard said. “I have no problem supporting Mr. Trump.”

It takes 1,237 delegates to win the Republican nomination. Trump has reached 1,238. With 303 delegates at stake in five state primaries on June 7, Trump will easily pad his total, avoiding a contested convention in Cleveland.

GOP establishment splits over supporting Trump

Embed Share

Play Video2:46
Speaker Paul Ryan has backed away from his pledge to support whoever becomes the nominee, saying he’s “not ready” to endorse Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. Other GOP heavyweights, including the Bushes, are also not giving endorsements. (Jenny Starrs/The Washington Post)

Trump, a political neophyte who for years delivered caustic commentary on the state of the nation from the sidelines but had never run for office, fought off 16 other Republican contenders in an often ugly primary race.

Many on the right have been slow to warm to Trump, wary of his conservative bona fides. Others worry about his crass personality and the lewd comments he’s made about women.

But millions of grass-roots activists, many of them outsiders to the political process, have embraced him as a plain-speaking populist.

Steve House, chairman of the Colorado Republican Party and an unbound delegate who confirmed his support of Trump to the AP, said he likes the billionaire’s background as a businessman.

“Leadership is leadership,” House said. “If he can surround himself with the political talent, I think he will be fine.”

Replay

 

Trump’s pivotal moment comes amid a new sign of internal problems.

Hours before clinching the nomination, he announced the abrupt departure of political director Rick Wiley, who was in the midst of leading the campaign’s push to hire staff in key battleground states. In a statement, Trump’s campaign said Wiley had been hired only until the candidate’s organization “was running full steam.”

Poll: Most voters see Trump and Clinton unfavorably

Embed Share

Play Video1:33
Here’s what a Washington Post/ABC News poll conducted May 16-19, 2016 said about the race between Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton and GOP candidate Donald Trump. (Sarah Parnass/The Washington Post)

His hiring about six weeks ago was seen as a sign that party veterans were embracing Trump’s campaign. But a person familiar with Wiley’s ouster said the operative clashed with others in Trump’s operation and didn’t want to put longtime Trump allies in key jobs. The person insisted on anonymity because the person was not authorized to publicly discuss the internal campaign dynamics.

Some delegates who confirmed their decisions to back Trump were tepid at best.

Cameron Linton of Pittsburgh said he will back Trump on the first ballot since he won the presidential primary vote in Linton’s congressional district.

“If there’s a second ballot I won’t vote for Donald Trump,” Linton said. “He’s ridiculous. There’s no other way to say it.”

Trump’s path to the Republican presidential nomination began with an escalator ride.

Trump and his wife, Melania, descended an escalator into the basement lobby of the Trump Tower on June 16, 2015, for an announcement many observers had said would never come: The celebrity real estate developer had flirted with running for office in the past.

His speech then set the tone for his ability to dominate the headlines with provocative statements, insults and hyperbole. He called Mexicans “rapists,” promised to build a wall between the U.S. and Mexico and proposed banning most Muslims from the U.S. for an indeterminate time.

He criticized women for their looks. And he unleashed an uncanny marketing ability in which he deduced his critics’ weak points and distilled them to nicknames that stuck. “Little Marco” Rubio, “Weak” Jeb Bush and “Lyin’ Ted” Cruz, among others, all were forced into reacting to Trump. They fell one-by-one — leaving Trump the sole survivor of a riotous Republican primary.

CONTENT FROM SAMSUNGConnectivity for a smarter world

The Internet of Things (IoT) has the potential to solve our biggest global challenges and bring people everywhere a better quality of life.

 

His rallies became magnets for free publicity. Onstage, he dispensed populism that drew thousands of supporters, many wearing his trademark “Make America Great Again” hats and chanting, “Build the wall!”

The events drew protests too— with demonstrators sometimes forcibly ejected.

When voting started, Trump was not so fast out of the gate.

He lost the Iowa caucuses in February, falling behind Cruz and barely edging Rubio for second. He recovered in New Hampshire. From there he and Cruz fiercely engaged, with Trump winning some and losing some but one way or another dominating the rest of the primary season — in votes or at least in attention — and ultimately in delegates.

He incurred relatively low campaign costs — just $57 million through the end of April. He covered most of it with at least $43 million of his own money loaned to the campaign.

Trump entered a new phase of his campaign Tuesday night by holding his first major campaign fundraiser: a $25,000-per-ticket dinner in Los Angeles.

Trump, 69, the son of a New York City real estate magnate, had risen to fame in the 1980s and 1990s, overseeing major real estate deals, watching his financial fortunes rise, then fall, hosting “The Apprentice” TV show and authoring more than a dozen books.

___

Associated Press writers James Nord in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Marc Levy in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, James MacPherson in Bismarck, North Dakota, Jill Colvin in Anaheim, California, Steve Peoples in Washington and Sean Murphy in Oklahoma City contributed to this report.

Hours before clinching the nomination, he announced the abrupt departure of political director Rick Wiley, who was in the midst of leading the campaign’s push to hire staff in key battleground states. In a statement, Trump’s campaign said Wiley had been hired only until the candidate’s organization “was running full steam.”

Here’s what a Washington Post/ABC News poll conducted May 16-19, 2016 said about the race between Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton and GOP candidate Donald Trump. (Sarah Parnass/The Washington Post)

His hiring about six weeks ago was seen as a sign that party veterans were embracing Trump’s campaign. But a person familiar with Wiley’s ouster said the operative clashed with others in Trump’s operation and didn’t want to put longtime Trump allies in key jobs. The person insisted on anonymity because the person was not authorized to publicly discuss the internal campaign dynamics.

Some delegates who confirmed their decisions to back Trump were tepid at best.

Cameron Linton of Pittsburgh said he will back Trump on the first ballot since he won the presidential primary vote in Linton’s congressional district.

“If there’s a second ballot I won’t vote for Donald Trump,” Linton said. “He’s ridiculous. There’s no other way to say it.”

Trump’s path to the Republican presidential nomination began with an escalator ride.

Trump and his wife, Melania, descended an escalator into the basement lobby of the Trump Tower on June 16, 2015, for an announcement many observers had said would never come: The celebrity real estate developer had flirted with running for office in the past.

His speech then set the tone for his ability to dominate the headlines with provocative statements, insults and hyperbole. He called Mexicans “rapists,” promised to build a wall between the U.S. and Mexico and proposed banning most Muslims from the U.S. for an indeterminate time.

He criticized women for their looks. And he unleashed an uncanny marketing ability in which he deduced his critics’ weak points and distilled them to nicknames that stuck. “Little Marco” Rubio, “Weak” Jeb Bush and “Lyin’ Ted” Cruz, among others, all were forced into reacting to Trump. They fell one-by-one — leaving Trump the sole survivor of a riotous Republican primary.

The Internet of Things (IoT) has the potential to solve our biggest global challenges and bring people everywhere a better quality of life.

 

His rallies became magnets for free publicity. Onstage, he dispensed populism that drew thousands of supporters, many wearing his trademark “Make America Great Again” hats and chanting, “Build the wall!”

The events drew protests too— with demonstrators sometimes forcibly ejected.

When voting started, Trump was not so fast out of the gate.

He lost the Iowa caucuses in February, falling behind Cruz and barely edging Rubio for second. He recovered in New Hampshire. From there he and Cruz fiercely engaged, with Trump winning some and losing some but one way or another dominating the rest of the primary season — in votes or at least in attention — and ultimately in delegates.

He incurred relatively low campaign costs — just $57 million through the end of April. He covered most of it with at least $43 million of his own money loaned to the campaign.

Trump entered a new phase of his campaign Tuesday night by holding his first major campaign fundraiser: a $25,000-per-ticket dinner in Los Angeles.

Trump, 69, the son of a New York City real estate magnate, had risen to fame in the 1980s and 1990s, overseeing major real estate deals, watching his financial fortunes rise, then fall, hosting “The Apprentice” TV show and authoring more than a dozen books.

Associated Press writers James Nord in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Marc Levy in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, James MacPherson in Bismarck, North Dakota, Jill Colvin in Anaheim, California, Steve Peoples in Washington and Sean Murphy in Oklahoma City contributed to this report.

Investigation Looks at Actual Qualifications of Dentists to Extract Teeth

Investigation Looks at Actual Qualifications of Dentists to Extract Teeth

(HEADLINE NEWS guru 5/22/2016) It is important that all the potential risks, benefits, complications and alternative treatment options of tooth removal be reviewed with a patient prior to any surgery.
In the eyes of a dental professional, such as a general dentist or a board certified oral and maxillofacial surgeon, the definition of a “routine procedure” is objective. Most all professionals would argue that there are extractions which are more complicated than others, and this is the area that appears grey.1.
These more complex oral surgical procedures are often performed by non-oral surgeon (general dentist) professionals and yet there are no real stats to determine how many of these cases have a higher post-operative complication rate, versus if the patient would have gone to an oral surgeon.
WebMD recommends that patients research the education and training of their dentist under “recommendations for choosing a dentist.” This makes it appear that for a top visited website such as Web MD, a website that must be rather neutral and apolitical; they put significant weight on this topic’s importance. In fact, it is in their top three suggestions: advising patients to find a qualified professional when it is recommended to have a tooth extracted. WebMD even references the educational institutions from where the dentist graduated.2
So what does this tell us? It appears they are indirectly conveying an associated risk with choosing a professional that does not have the proper training or experience.
So how can patients safeguard and assure their best chance for a successful procedure? Headline News asked the top reviewed oral surgeon in Newport Beach, CA (according to Yelp, Health Grades, Google plus, and a list of other medical review authorities) for his opinion. 3dr_Tom_michaelis
Dr. Thomas R. Michaelis (www.DentalSurgery.guru) stated, “I see a lot of mistakes from general dentists who attempted procedures that were possibly above their training level. Today’s medical field has become so specialized; it is in the best interest of a patient to be treated by a team of dental specialists instead of a single “generalist”. In fact, I reverse refer a lot of my patients back to my team of general dentists for restorative work once surgery has been completed. The general dentists are extremely well trained in these restorative procedures and they are much better at it that I am. Even though I am also a dentist, I know that any patient of mine will be far better off having a general dentist perform their restorative work than me. However, my additional 6 years of medical education and surgical training beyond dental school has helped me perform procedures such as dental implants and wisdom tooth removal at the highest level, with proven success. I mean, if you were told you needed a hip replacement, would you prefer the board certified orthopedic surgeon or the family practioner who went to a weekend course? It’s the same principle. “
Dr. Michaelis went on to tell us that removing teeth, while not a particularly pleasant experience for patients, is a routine and uncomplicated procedure in the hands of a well-trained expert. For most oral surgeons, wisdom tooth removal is the mainstay of their practice and the 4 to 6 years of additional training beyond dental school helps minimize the complication rate and make the procedure as routine as possible.
What keeps a tooth in place in its native bone is a membrane or ligament that surrounds the tooth root called the periodontal ligament (“peri” – around; “odont” – root). The main fibers of the ligament surround the tooth at a slanted angle similar to a hammock and attach it to the bone. By carefully manipulating the tooth and with qualified training, these fibers can be fairly easily dislodged, allowing the tooth to be removed quite simply. Believe it or not, there is a real art and “feel” involved in tooth removal, making it both routine and relatively simple.2
To ensure the extraction is “simple” in the professional sense is not so simple. It involves proper assessment and diagnosis beforehand, in particular of the shape and status of the tooth or teeth to be removed, and the surrounding bone in which they are encased. Routine radiographic (x-ray) examination will allow that determination. In addition, the oral surgeon should also take a thorough medical and drug history, to both ensure that you are healthy enough to undergo this minor surgery, and that you have normal blood clotting and wound healing mechanisms.
Our investigation concurs with WebMD and the seemingly vast amount of other online resources whereas proper homework should be executed prior to choosing a dental professional for complex and noncomplex “routine” procedures. It is also important to realize that oral surgeons have an additional 4 to 6 years of medical education and surgical training compared to a general dentist. This fact is what really separates the specialist from the generalist and the importance of that difference should not be overlooked.
On a final note, it is important to understand that there is only one standard of care for dental surgery. This standard is always established by the specialists in the field. Just because a general dentist has 4-6 fewer years of education and surgical experience than an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, does not mean they are allowed to practice at a lower standard of care. They are held to the same standard as the specialist, but with less training.
1.http://www.deardoctor.com/inside-the-magazine/issue-15/tooth-extractio
2.http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/oral-health-care-providers?page=2n/#sthash.29UHrLQH.dpuf
3. https://dentalsurgery.guru/category/a-patients-advice-for-potential-patients/before-you-make-a-dental-surgery-decision-read-this/
4. W. Jerjes, T. Upile, F. Nhembe, D. Gudka, P. Shah, S. Abbas, E. McCarthy, S. Patel, J. Mahil & C. Hopper. Experience in third molar surgery: an update British Dental Journal 209, E1 (2010)
Published online: 2 July 2010 | doi:10.1038/sj.bdj.2010.581
_____________________________________________________________________Henry Thomas Whittikar – Medical Specialist Journalist
IJR News Assistant Editor in Chief Newport Coast, CA 657-222-7074

Xiaomi is getting into the drone business.

Xiaomi is getting into the drone business. The Chinese manufacturer mostly known for its aggressively priced high-end smartphones today introduced the Mi Drone, a camera-wielding quadcopter that undercuts comparable models from market leader DJI by over $300. Two models will be available: the cheaper one, priced at 2,499 Chinese Yuan (just over $380), will feature a 1080p camera, while the 4K model is 2,999 Yuan ($457).

The ball-shaped camera on the higher-end Mi Drone uses a Sony 12.4-megapixel sensor that can capture video at up to 3,840 x 2,160 at 30 fps and take RAW photos, while On the lower end 1080p model, Xiaomi has packed a 16-megapixel Sony backside illuminated CMOS and a 104-degree wide angle lens. Both feature a detachable gimbal that does 3-axis stabilization and is assisted by an optical flow sensor positioned between the camera and the battery bay on the back.

Xiaomi says the Mi drones will have 27 minutes of flying time on their 5,100 mAh batteries, with a range of of 3 kilometers. Like DJI, Xiaomi will build geofences into its drones to prevent them fromIn terms of design the drone itself looks quite a bit like DJI’s Phantom drones.

There’s a standalone controller with a dedicated button for take off and landing and a built-in smartphone clamp so you can use it as a viewfinder. flying into restricted areas. The drone will automatically return to base when its battery is dying or when it loses contact with the controller.

 

Sage Northcutt returns against Andrew Holbrook at UFC in New Jersey

Sage Northcutt returns against Andrew Holbrook at UFC in New Jersey

Sage Northcutt will get one more fight before he’s no longer a teenager when he takes on Andrew Holbrook at FOX UFC Fight Night in Newark, N.J. on Jan. 30.

87436801

Josh Hedges/Zuffa LLC

Sage Northcutt will get one more fight before he’s no longer a teenager when he takes on Andrew Holbrook at FOX UFC Fight Night in Newark, N.J. on Jan. 30.

The 19-year-old prospect has been ultra-busy since making his debut at UFC 192 in October and following his win last week over Cody Pfister, Northcutt requested one more bout before he turns 20 in March.

The UFC granted his wish, and now Northcutt will return in January while looking to improve to 3-0 inside the Octagon.

Northcutt has finished his first two fights in impressive fashion, with a TKO victory in his debut before submitting Pfister with a guillotine choke last Thursday in Las Vegas.

He’ll face his stiffest test to date in January as he faces Holbrook, who is 11-0 during his career after making his UFC debut in July

Holbrook eked out a close decision over Ramsey Nijem in a fight he accepted on short notice, and now he’ll fight on the main card on FOX in January with a chance to take out a rising star in Northcutt.

Northcutt vs. Holbrook joins the upcoming FOX UFC Fight Night card in Newark with a light heavyweight bout between Anthony “Rumble” Johnson and Ryan Bader headlining the show.

Comprehensive tax information for Uber drivers and Lyft drivers goes beyond TurboTax tips

(2/1/2016 Headline News.Guru) I Drive with Uber (IDWU), the evolving authority for Uber and Lyft drivers, released free comprehensive tax information specifically geared towards ridesharing drivers.

I Drive With Uber is regarded as a leading authority and information provider for Uber drivers. The website’s mission is to do just that – provide information for Uber and Lyft drivers/passengers that goes beyond the actual Uber website.

Time For Taxes Message Shows Taxation Due
Time For Taxes Message Showing Taxation Due

If you are one of the many new drivers for Uber or Lyft (or one of other ride sharing companies), filing your 2015 taxes is most likely uncharted territory for you. “I Drive With Uber” realized this and collaborated with a tax specialist to lay down the ‘rules and regulations’, and created a tax preparation guide for drivers. I Drive With Uber is providing this free extensive info packet on their website.

Uber identifies its drivers as independent contractors and not as employees. This subject, whether Uber drivers should be classified as employees or independent contractors, is currently being litigated in numerous states in the US. However, until a decision has been reached, Uber drivers will have to file taxes as self-employed individuals (1099 contractors).

This is one of the key points the tax guide on the IDWU website focuses on: the difference between being a 1099 independent contractor versus a traditional employee (which many new drivers mistakenly think they are). Furthermore, the guide elaborates on the tax benefits and deductions that are available for ride share drivers. Many drivers will be surprised about the numerous tax deductions they are actually entitled to.

The IDWU guide provides relevant information for any Uber or Lyft driver in the process of preparing for the current 2016 tax season. Other than the above-mentioned topics, other covered subjects include: self-employment tax, estimated tax payments, Social Security tax, Medicare tax, and many more. If you’re thinking of becoming an Uber driver or already are driving for Uber or Lyft, IDWU is a valuable information platform for you.

Michael Gingino \ 2012 Multi awarded ICFJ Honoree

Headline News Guru – International Journalism Review

657 222-7074 Newport Coast / New York

Top candidates attack but express cautious optimism about winning

Headlinenews.guru 2/1/2016 – The first major test for the 2016 presidential candidates is now just hours away with the Iowa Caucus on Monday — its outcome a likely sign of whether front-running Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump can hold their leads or if the unpredictable and often-angry electorate has other plans.

Trump and Clinton made their closing arguments Sunday, barnstorming across Iowa and battling on the political shows, in a final effort to beat back close rivals like Democratic candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders and Republican Sen. Ted Cruz, both eager for an upset in the first-in-the-nation balloting.

“Thirty six hours from now, the men and women of Iowa are going to caucus,” Cruz, who is trailing Trump in Iowa by roughly 5 percentage points, told “Fox News Sunday.” “And we have a grassroots army. We’ve got 12,000 volunteers in the state.”

Still, Cruz, who argues that he’s the true conservative in the GOP field, was, like the rest of this year’s White House candidates, steering clear of predicting a win, then having to face the fallout from a loss or even a below-expectations finish.

“Right now, this is all about turnout,” said Cruz, a Texas senator in a close race for second with Florida Sen. Marco Rubio. “This is all about who shows up tomorrow night at 7. … If conservatives come out, we will win.”

Sanders, a Vermont independent, told ABC’s “This Week”: “I think we have a shot to win it, if people come out.”

His populist message about the economy being “rigged” against the middle class and “billionaires buying elections” has resonated with the largely disaffected and angry electorate and has posed a clear alternative to the Clinton political dynasty.

Even the supremely confident Trump, who has a double-digit national lead over the GOP field, tamped down Iowa expectations Sunday.

“I don’t have to win it,” he said on CBS’ “Face the Nation.” “I’m doing really well with the evangelicals in Iowa. But I’m also doing tremendously well all over the country with the evangelicals. … I think we have a good chance of winning Iowa.”

Still, Trump, who has a wider lead among the more independent-minded voters of New Hampshire, who vote second, on Feb. 9, realizes the importance of a lead-off victory.

“I have a very substantial lead in New Hampshire,” he told CBS. “But I think it would be really good to win Iowa. I’d like to win Iowa.”

And at least 9 percent of potential Iowa caucus-goers remain undecided, according to a Des Moines Register-Bloomberg Politics poll released Saturday.

After New Hampshire, the voting continues in South Carolina and Nevada, with the outcomes of those so-called “early-state votes” expected to winnow the GOP’s 11-candidate field.

After Trump and Cruz, Rubio is the only other GOP candidate with double-digit poll numbers.

They are followed by retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, Ohio Gov. John Kasich, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, former business executive Carly Fiorina and former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum.

Santorum and Huckabee, popular among social conservatives, won Iowa in 2012 and 2008, respectively.

Though none of the candidates below Rubio is expected to make a strong Iowa finish, Kasich, Christie and even Bush could do well in New Hampshire and challenge the frontrunners — as the GOP and Democratic races head across the south and into the late spring before this summer’s nominating conventions.

Kasich was the only candidate in New Hampshire on Sunday, telling potential voters at an Elks Lodge in Salem that cutting regulations that kill small businesses would be a priority of his first 100 days, if elected president.

Trump and Cruz each attended Sunday morning church services with family members.

Trump attended services at the First Christian Orchard Campus, a nondenominational church in Council Bluffs.

Cruz went to the Lutheran Church of Hope, outside Des Moines. The sermon called on politicians to treat their opponents with love, not attack ads.

Trump has tapped into the angry electorate with plans to build a wall along the southern U.S. border to keep out “drug dealers” and others from Mexico. And in the wake of two recent terror attacks, he proposed keeping Muslim from entering the United States until the government improves its immigrant-screening process.

Amid some public outcry, Trump’s poll numbers increased by double digits after his called for the ban, in the aftermath of the San Bernardino, Calif., massacre in December.

Since Cruz emerged in recent weeks as Trump’s closest primary rival, Trump has called Cruz “a nasty guy” and a “liar,” particularly about whether Trump essentially supports ObamaCare.

The only other Democratic candidate is former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley, who has single-digit poll numbers.

The front-running Clinton, who has a superior fundraising and campaign apparatus, continues to hold a roughly 25-point national lead over Sanders.

However, the former first lady has been stuck defending herself in a controversy about her use of a private server/email setup to conduct official business when secretary of state.

On Friday, the State Department said it had identified 22 “top secret” emails that it would not release, as part of a court order to make public Clinton’s email correspondence.

“It’s a continuation of a story that’s been playing out for months,” Clinton told ABC News.

Clinton also said that none of the emails was marked classified at the time, and she again called for their released, in an apparent effort to help end the controversy. She also suggested that Republicans were “grabbing at straws” on the issue.

“I want to see them disclosed,” she told ABC.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

HILLARY CLINTON’S LEAD in the Democratic primary race has narrowed to its slimmest margin yet in the new Fox News national poll, with 49 percent of primary voters supporting the former secretary of state, down from 54 percent two weeks ago, while Bernie Sanders also drops by two points to 37 percent.

Hillary Clinton’s lead in the Democratic primary race has narrowed to its slimmest margin yet.

The front-runner’s support has slipped under 50 percent, and cracks may be appearing in what some called her “firewall” — the African-American voter bloc.

Here are the numbers from the latest Fox News national poll:

Forty-nine percent of Democratic primary voters now support Clinton — down from 54 percent two weeks ago.

Bernie Sanders also drops — by two points — to 37 percent. Martin O’Malley, down two ticks as well, gets 1 percent.

Ten percent are undecided — a sign the race is more fluid than it seemed two weeks ago when only two percent were undecided.

Last June, Clinton held a 46-point lead over Sanders.  Since then, Sanders’s support has grown slowly but steadily, while Clinton’s support has ebbed and recovered once — and now appears in danger of another reversal.

Clinton’s sagging support is due, at least in part, to erosion among black voters.  While 67 percent support her, that’s down from 78 percent two weeks ago and 84 percent in December.

“This comes against a backdrop of extreme volatility in stock markets and increasing pessimism about the economy,” says Dana Blanton, vice president of public opinion research for Fox News. “For the first time in over three years, more Americans think the economy is getting worse than better.”

A year ago, 53 percent thought the economy was getting better and 36 percent said worse.  Now 46 percent think it’s getting worse and 39 percent better.

Sanders says as president he will, “Break up the big banks, close the tax loopholes, and make them pay their fair share.”  He has criticized Clinton for being too close to Wall Street and in the last Democratic debate said the first difference between them is, “I don’t take money from big banks. I don’t get personal speaking fees from Goldman Sachs.”

The big dividing line among Democrats continues to be age, with Sanders leading by 26 points among those under 45 and Clinton leading by 42 points among those ages 45 and over.

Sanders voters tend to be dissatisfied (69 percent) with the workings of the federal government, while Clinton voters are about as likely to be satisfied (50 percent) as dissatisfied (47 percent).

About one-quarter (27 percent) of Sanders voters will be pleased if Clinton gets the nomination, while one-fifth (19 percent) would be so dissatisfied they’d stay home in November instead of voting for her.

Clinton voters would be more accepting of Sanders as the nominee — 43 percent say they’d be satisfied with him, while 13 percent of Clinton voters say they probably won’t vote if Bernie is the nominee.

One thing Sanders and Clinton supporters have in common is that they’d rather Joe Biden be the nominee than their candidate’s current opponent.  Half (51 percent) of Clinton supporters and 39 percent of Sanders voters would be satisfied with the vice president as the Democratic nominee.

Honesty (30 percent) is the top quality Democratic primary voters want in their nominee, followed by the right experience (22 percent), caring about people like themselves (17 percent) and the ability to win in November (8 percent).

Among those who say honesty is most important, Sanders leads Clinton by 27 points.

Both Sanders (84 percent) and Clinton (93 percent) supporters overwhelmingly approve of the job Barack Obama is doing as president.  For comparison, 92 percent of Republican front-runner Donald Trump’s supporters disapprove of Obama.

Overall, 45 percent of voters approve and 48 percent disapprove of Obama’s job performance.  This is an improvement from early January when 42 percent approved and 53 percent disapproved.

The Fox News poll is based on landline and cellphone interviews with 1,009 randomly chosen registered voters nationwide and was conducted under the joint direction of Anderson Robbins Research (D) and Shaw & Company Research (R) from January 18-21, 2016.  The poll has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus three percentage points for all registered voters, and 5 points for the Democratic primary voter sample (375).

  • FOX NEWS POLL: Sanders up by 22 points in New Hampshire
  • FOX NEWS POLL: Sanders narrows gap in Iowa
  • 7 DAYS LEFT: Presidential candidates race to Iowa kick-off
  • CHILLY WELCOME: Sanders not thrilled about a Bloomberg bid
  • ‘WITHOUT A DOUBT’: Rick Perry endorses Ted Cruz
  • CAMPAIGN 2016 LIVE BLOG