Obama: World leaders ‘rattled’ by Trump

President Barack Obama touched on the rancorous U.S. presidential race at a press conference Thursday from the G-7 summit in Japan, saying that presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump’s statements had his fellow world leaders concerned.

By Euan McKirdy, CNNUpdated 12:17 PM ET, Thu May 26, 2016
“They’re rattled by him and for good reason,” Obama said. “Because a lot of the proposals that he’s made display either ignorance of world affairs or a cavalier attitude or an interest in getting tweets and headlines instead of actually thinking through what is required to keep America safe.”
“They are surprised by (Trump), not sure how to take some of his pronouncements,” the President added.
Obama said the world is watching the campaign.
Opinion: Who in the world really wants Donald Trump to win?
“The world pays attention to U.S. elections,” Obama said. “They pay more attention to our elections sometimes than we pay to theirs. The U.S. is … at the heart of the international order and even those countries that are critical of us…know that ultimately things don’t hold together so well if the U.S. isn’t making good decisions and they count on us to provide stability when making global decisions.”

Slovenia – Melania, the third Mrs. Trump, is from Sevnica. Some locals are hopeful a Trump win might lead to publicity and additional donations from Melania. (She gave to the local health clinic after the 2006 birth of their son, Barron.)
Indonesia – 2015 saw the announcement of Trump’s first and second properties in Asia, with a resort situated in “the most magnificent location in Bali” and another in Lido Lakes that shall be “the pride of Indonesia.”
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Sweden – This popular Swedish site allows people to give Donald a blast of trump(et). It’s been blown 110,000,000 times and counting.
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Ireland – In 2014, Trump invested $20 million in a property in County Clare — the downside is that it’s collapsing into the sea. His proposal to build what Friends of the Irish Environment termed a “monster sea wall” met with local outrage.

China – Trump-branded clothes that don’t read “Made in Mexico” often say “Made in China.” Trump explained this in 2011 by declaring, “China so manipulates their currency it makes it almost impossible for American companies to compete.”

The Donald Trump travel guide – Donald Trump is truly a man of the world, even if the world doesn’t always see it that way. Click through the gallery to see what we mean.

Scotland – Trump’s development of an Aberdeen golf resort triggered a vicious (and still ongoing) feud with neighbors, who gave their side in the 2011 film “You’ve Been Trumped.”

Czech Republic – Clearly not content with being known just as the birthplace of Ivana, the first Mrs. Trump, the Czech town of Zlin in 2014 staged the country’s largest ever pillow fight.

Scotland – Trump’s development of an Aberdeen golf resort triggered a vicious (and still ongoing) feud with neighbors, who gave their side in the 2011 film “You’ve Been Trumped.”
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Mexico – “When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best,” Trump famously said. “They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.” This fiery Mexico City tribute shows how this statement went down in the country.

Germany – Kallstadt is Trump’s German ancestral home. However, when Deutsche Welle contacted Trump’s distant relations they elicited little more on the record than, “Hopefully this hype will ease up soon.”

Czech Republic – Clearly not content with being known just as the birthplace of Ivana, the first Mrs. Trump, the Czech town of Zlin in 2014 staged the country’s largest ever pillow fight.

People get ‘grumpy’
Asked about the continued divisiveness on display on the Democratic side of the 2016 race, Obama said people get “grumpy” during the primaries, including his own back in 2008, but will ultimately come together and argued that Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders largely agree on the policy front, but differ on tactics.
The President said that and that it’s important to finish the Democratic primary contest in a way that doesn’t leave anyone with ruffled feathers.
“I would urge and have urged, both sides to stick to the issues,” Obama said. “They’re both good people, I know them both well, and I think its’ important to try to end this in a way that leaves both sides feeling proud of what they’ve done.”
He added, “I guarantee you that the eventual nominee sure wishes it were over now. It’s a grind, it’s hard.”The president said he wanted the Democratic primary to “play out, let voters make up their minds.”
Obama also largely deflected questions about Clinton’s use of a private email server, saying he’s addressed the topic previously and the questions would be better put to the campaign.

 

Thursday morning saw the leaders of Japan, the U.S., UK, Italy, Germany, France, Italy and Canada gather in the grounds of the Ise-Jingu shrine, a 2,000-year-old temple in central Japan.
Obama also said he is going to Hiroshima Friday to underscore the “very real risks” of nuclear weapons and the “urgency that we all should have,” he said.
He will become the first U.S. President to visit the Japanese city where the first atomic bomb was dropped.
Obama told reporters that the dropping of the bomb was an “inflection point in modern history” and is something “all of us have had to deal with in one way or another.”

20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama shakes hands with chef Anthony Bourdain in a shopping area of Hanoi on May 24. The President sat down with Bourdain to film a scene for CNN’s “Parts Unknown.”
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
People gather in the rain to watch Obama’s motorcade in Hanoi on May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama meets with members of the Vietnamese Civil Society in Hanoi on May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama delivers remarks at the National Convention Center in Hanoi on May 24. Obama made a forceful case for human rights in Vietnam and called for the “peaceful resolution” of disputes in the South China Sea.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama walks to the left of Thi Kim Ngan, chairwoman of Vietnam’s National Assembly, at the Presidential Palace in Hanoi on Monday, May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama meets with Nguyen Phu Trong, the Vietnamese Communist Party’s general secretary, in Hanoi on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama, with Secretary of State John Kerry and other Cabinet members, attends a meeting with Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc, third from right, on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama gives a toast during a state luncheon hosted by Vietnam’s President in Hanoi on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama holds a news conference with Vietnamese President Tran Dai Quang on May 23. Obama announced the United States is fully lifting the decades-long ban on the sale of military equipment to Vietnam. He said the removal of the ban was part of a deeper defense cooperation with the country and dismissed suggestions it was aimed at countering China’s growing strength in the region.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
The two Presidents listen to their countries’ national anthems during a welcoming ceremony at the Presidential Palace in Hanoi on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
From left: Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, French President François Hollande, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, U.S. President Barack Obama, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, European Council President Donald Tusk and British Prime Minister David Cameron walk past the Kagura-den as they visit Ise Jingu shrine in Ise, Japan, on Thursday, May 26. Obama is visiting Japan and Vietnam during his 10th trip to Asia.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
World leaders join in a ceremony to plant trees at Ise Jingu shrine in Ise, Japan, on May 26. Obama and other major world leaders are in Japan for a Group of Seven, or G7, summit.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
From left: British Prime Minister David Cameron, Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, U.S. President Barack Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau talk together after a group photo session at the G7 summit in Shima, Japan, on May 26.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
U.S. President Barack Obama pauses for a translation during a bilateral meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Shima, Japan, on Wednesday, May 25.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama is greeted by U.S. Ambassador to Japan Caroline Kennedy and her husband, Edwin Arthur Schlossberg, at the airport in Tokoname, Japan, on May 25.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama shakes hands after speaking at a town-hall event in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, on May 25.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Vietnamese rapper Suboi raps during the town-hall event, which was for the Young Southeast Asian Leaders Initiative.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama tours through entrepreneur demonstrations in Ho Chi Minh City on Tuesday, May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama pays his respects during a visit to the Jade Pagoda in Ho Chi Minh City on May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama waves to locals during a visit to a shopping district in Hanoi, Vietnam, on May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama shakes hands with chef Anthony Bourdain in a shopping area of Hanoi on May 24. The President sat down with Bourdain to film a scene for CNN’s “Parts Unknown.”
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
People gather in the rain to watch Obama’s motorcade in Hanoi on May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama meets with members of the Vietnamese Civil Society in Hanoi on May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama delivers remarks at the National Convention Center in Hanoi on May 24. Obama made a forceful case for human rights in Vietnam and called for the “peaceful resolution” of disputes in the South China Sea.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama walks to the left of Thi Kim Ngan, chairwoman of Vietnam’s National Assembly, at the Presidential Palace in Hanoi on Monday, May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama meets with Nguyen Phu Trong, the Vietnamese Communist Party’s general secretary, in Hanoi on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama, with Secretary of State John Kerry and other Cabinet members, attends a meeting with Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc, third from right, on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama gives a toast during a state luncheon hosted by Vietnam’s President in Hanoi on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama holds a news conference with Vietnamese President Tran Dai Quang on May 23. Obama announced the United States is fully lifting the decades-long ban on the sale of military equipment to Vietnam. He said the removal of the ban was part of a deeper defense cooperation with the country and dismissed suggestions it was aimed at countering China’s growing strength in the region.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
The two Presidents listen to their countries’ national anthems during a welcoming ceremony at the Presidential Palace in Hanoi on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
From left: Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, French President François Hollande, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, U.S. President Barack Obama, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, European Council President Donald Tusk and British Prime Minister David Cameron walk past the Kagura-den as they visit Ise Jingu shrine in Ise, Japan, on Thursday, May 26. Obama is visiting Japan and Vietnam during his 10th trip to Asia.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
World leaders join in a ceremony to plant trees at Ise Jingu shrine in Ise, Japan, on May 26. Obama and other major world leaders are in Japan for a Group of Seven, or G7, summit.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
From left: British Prime Minister David Cameron, Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, U.S. President Barack Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau talk together after a group photo session at the G7 summit in Shima, Japan, on May 26.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
U.S. President Barack Obama pauses for a translation during a bilateral meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Shima, Japan, on Wednesday, May 25.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama is greeted by U.S. Ambassador to Japan Caroline Kennedy and her husband, Edwin Arthur Schlossberg, at the airport in Tokoname, Japan, on May 25.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama shakes hands after speaking at a town-hall event in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, on May 25.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Vietnamese rapper Suboi raps during the town-hall event, which was for the Young Southeast Asian Leaders Initiative.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama tours through entrepreneur demonstrations in Ho Chi Minh City on Tuesday, May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama pays his respects during a visit to the Jade Pagoda in Ho Chi Minh City on May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama waves to locals during a visit to a shopping district in Hanoi, Vietnam, on May 24.
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He added that the “backdrop of a nuclear event remains something that, I think, presses on the back of our imaginations.”
Obama also remarked on importance of reducing nuclear weapons and the progress made in that arena, citing the Iran deal.
Obama said that nuclear proliferation, particularly from North Korea, remained a major concern.
“Obviously ISIL using rifles, crude bombs, could kill a lot of people in a Paris or a Brussels and people are rightly insisting the world community stamp out ISIL and there is a reason why were focused on that,” he said, using another acronym for the terror group.

Obama and Vietnam’s ‘Queen of Hip Hop’ 01:58
But, he added: “We can’t focus on the short term … when you have a regime (in North Korea) that is so isolated and flouts international rules, devotes national resources hell bent on getting nuclear weapons.”
Obama said the G-7 meetings so far had been “extremely productive.”
“For us to (be able to) get together and focus on critical issues … is vitally important,” he said.
He said the meetings had focused on trade and issues facing the global economy, and how the group could work to accelerate growth and “put people back to work,” and the importance of stepping back from protectionist policies that leave countries collectively weaker.

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HILLARY CLINTON’S LEAD in the Democratic primary race has narrowed to its slimmest margin yet in the new Fox News national poll, with 49 percent of primary voters supporting the former secretary of state, down from 54 percent two weeks ago, while Bernie Sanders also drops by two points to 37 percent.

Hillary Clinton’s lead in the Democratic primary race has narrowed to its slimmest margin yet.

The front-runner’s support has slipped under 50 percent, and cracks may be appearing in what some called her “firewall” — the African-American voter bloc.

Here are the numbers from the latest Fox News national poll:

Forty-nine percent of Democratic primary voters now support Clinton — down from 54 percent two weeks ago.

Bernie Sanders also drops — by two points — to 37 percent. Martin O’Malley, down two ticks as well, gets 1 percent.

Ten percent are undecided — a sign the race is more fluid than it seemed two weeks ago when only two percent were undecided.

Last June, Clinton held a 46-point lead over Sanders.  Since then, Sanders’s support has grown slowly but steadily, while Clinton’s support has ebbed and recovered once — and now appears in danger of another reversal.

Clinton’s sagging support is due, at least in part, to erosion among black voters.  While 67 percent support her, that’s down from 78 percent two weeks ago and 84 percent in December.

“This comes against a backdrop of extreme volatility in stock markets and increasing pessimism about the economy,” says Dana Blanton, vice president of public opinion research for Fox News. “For the first time in over three years, more Americans think the economy is getting worse than better.”

A year ago, 53 percent thought the economy was getting better and 36 percent said worse.  Now 46 percent think it’s getting worse and 39 percent better.

Sanders says as president he will, “Break up the big banks, close the tax loopholes, and make them pay their fair share.”  He has criticized Clinton for being too close to Wall Street and in the last Democratic debate said the first difference between them is, “I don’t take money from big banks. I don’t get personal speaking fees from Goldman Sachs.”

The big dividing line among Democrats continues to be age, with Sanders leading by 26 points among those under 45 and Clinton leading by 42 points among those ages 45 and over.

Sanders voters tend to be dissatisfied (69 percent) with the workings of the federal government, while Clinton voters are about as likely to be satisfied (50 percent) as dissatisfied (47 percent).

About one-quarter (27 percent) of Sanders voters will be pleased if Clinton gets the nomination, while one-fifth (19 percent) would be so dissatisfied they’d stay home in November instead of voting for her.

Clinton voters would be more accepting of Sanders as the nominee — 43 percent say they’d be satisfied with him, while 13 percent of Clinton voters say they probably won’t vote if Bernie is the nominee.

One thing Sanders and Clinton supporters have in common is that they’d rather Joe Biden be the nominee than their candidate’s current opponent.  Half (51 percent) of Clinton supporters and 39 percent of Sanders voters would be satisfied with the vice president as the Democratic nominee.

Honesty (30 percent) is the top quality Democratic primary voters want in their nominee, followed by the right experience (22 percent), caring about people like themselves (17 percent) and the ability to win in November (8 percent).

Among those who say honesty is most important, Sanders leads Clinton by 27 points.

Both Sanders (84 percent) and Clinton (93 percent) supporters overwhelmingly approve of the job Barack Obama is doing as president.  For comparison, 92 percent of Republican front-runner Donald Trump’s supporters disapprove of Obama.

Overall, 45 percent of voters approve and 48 percent disapprove of Obama’s job performance.  This is an improvement from early January when 42 percent approved and 53 percent disapproved.

The Fox News poll is based on landline and cellphone interviews with 1,009 randomly chosen registered voters nationwide and was conducted under the joint direction of Anderson Robbins Research (D) and Shaw & Company Research (R) from January 18-21, 2016.  The poll has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus three percentage points for all registered voters, and 5 points for the Democratic primary voter sample (375).

  • FOX NEWS POLL: Sanders up by 22 points in New Hampshire
  • FOX NEWS POLL: Sanders narrows gap in Iowa
  • 7 DAYS LEFT: Presidential candidates race to Iowa kick-off
  • CHILLY WELCOME: Sanders not thrilled about a Bloomberg bid
  • ‘WITHOUT A DOUBT’: Rick Perry endorses Ted Cruz
  • CAMPAIGN 2016 LIVE BLOG
complete auto protection

Red Auto Protection’s “Dealer Connect” Program Captures the Attention of Major U.S. Auto Dealerships and Receives Top Honors by Headline News

Red Auto Protection’s “Dealer Connect” Program Captures the Attention of Major U.S. Auto Dealerships and Receives Top Honors by Headline News

Information contained on this page is provided by an independent third-party content provider. WorldNow and this Station make no warranties or representations in connection therewith. If you have any questions or comments about this page please contactpressreleases@worldnow.com.

SOURCE Headline News Guru

NEW YORK, March 18, 2015 /PRNewswire/ — HeadlineNews.Guru – Red Auto Protection officially launches their “Dealer Connect” to dealerships across the country and sparks immediate demand.

Logo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150317/182316LOGO
Photo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150317/182315

Red Auto’s dealer connect program gives auto dealers the ability to remarket and build customer loyalty at no cost.  This is done by utilizing professional and well-trained sales agents, mixed with state of the art technology. The program is backed by one of the leading and most reputable providers in the United States.

With Red Auto Dealers Connect portal, dealerships can log in to this easy to use program and monitor their customers’ sales, services, have their customers called upon for necessary oil changes, maintenance, and offer extended warranty coverage for the current vehicle.

According to Red Auto Protection’s CMO Trevor Smith, “Only about 20% of the used vehicles sold at dealerships actually buy vehicle protection, this is not because the policy is bad, but because the salesman is trained to sell cars not explain the benefits of auto protection policies. This standard practice among dealerships is literally leaving hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost revenues for dealerships, agents, administrators, and more importantly, it’s leaving hundreds of thousands of customers without a protection plan.

Bob Youbanker, Sales manager from Newport Beach Lexus says, “Red Auto Protection has A+ Better Business Bureau rating and is Rip Off Report verified, and they use administrators that actually pay their claims, they are in a class all of their own.”

For dealerships it appears to be a win-win relationship in that they get to remarket to a customer base that for all intents and purposes, is often lost to a competitor; the best part is, it’s completely free to the dealership.

Better quality automobiles and their increased maintenance complexity and costs has led to Red Auto Protection’s newest dealer connect program. According to corporate executives, this program has been in development for a couple years and their enthusiasm about the program and the revolutionary program is transparent through their interviews.

IJR NEWS (Headlinenews.guru) spoke to Drew Edward Gilkey from Warranty Quote, who said, “Being a division of Red Auto Protection has been a great experience and honor. As their media correspondence leader, we have discovered along the way that they are a company that stands behind their product and takes care of their customers. This type of customer service is nice to see in this day and age, let’s eat.”

Red Auto Protection’s CEO, Elijah Norton, was also interviewed and said, “It’s pretty simple, many companies forget about the value of standing behind a product and the value of relationships with dealerships. We don’t, we select the top dealerships and match them with qualified and well-trained auto protection agents to tackle their remarketing needs and open great revenue streams. This program puts an awesome product in the control of a customer that, in the event of a breakdown, their budgets and livelihoods are protected.”

To learn more about Dealer Connect, call (877)-580-7750 or www.warrantyquote.net

Headline News Guru
Editor In Chief – CJ Green
657 222 7074

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/red-auto-protections-dealer-connect-program-captures-the-attention-of-major-us-auto-dealerships-and-receives-top-honors-by-headline-news-300051655.html

©2012 PR Newswire. All Rights Reserved.

People shop during day after Christmas sales at Citadel Outlets in Los Angeles, California December 26, 2014.

U.S. retail sales drop biggest in 11 months, but seen as a blip

(Reuters) – U.S. retail sales recorded their largest decline in 11 months in December as demand fell almost across the board, tempering expectations for a sharp acceleration in consumer spending in the fourth quarter.

Economists, however, cautioned against reading too much into the surprise weakness, noting that holiday spending made it difficult to smooth December data for seasonal fluctuations.

“Faulty seasonal adjustments from shifts in holiday spending patterns are probably more to blame for the December decline,” said Steve Blitz, chief economist at ITG in New York. “Looking at the last three months, spending is not collapsing.”

The Commerce Department said on Wednesday retail sales fell 0.9 percent, the biggest decline since last January, after increasing 0.4 percent in November.

Economists had expected only a 0.1 percent drop. Against the backdrop of a strengthening labor market and lower gasoline prices, they said sales should bounce back in January, with some saying December’s decline could be revised away.

Bricklin Dwyer, a senior economist at BNP Paribas in New York, said fewer post-Black Friday shopping days in November than normal threw off the so-called seasonal factor used to adjust the data, resulting in a lower December sales number.

“For January 2015, this seasonal factor will boost sales by the largest factor since 2006,” said Dwyer.

“This combined with the fact that we have seen a massive boost to consumer’s wallets as a result of the rapid decline in gasoline prices, suggests that January could be a big month that reverses much of the December drop,” he said.

Dismembered student identified

Canadian police identify head of dismembered student

Watch this video

(CNN) — A human head found in a Montreal park this week belongs to Jun Lin, the Chinese university student killed and dismembered in May, police said Wednesday.

The remains were discovered Sunday in Angrignon Park, and police had been waiting since then for them to be analyzed and results compiled before confirming their connection to the case.

Suspect Luka Magnotta is in Canada awaiting trial on first-degree murder and other charges in the case. Police have said they believe Magnotta filmed Lin’s death and dismemberment and posted the video to the Internet.

They say the 10-minute video also shows Magnotta engaged in sexual acts involving body parts and includes evidence of cannibalism.

 

Authorities were tipped to the case after finding Lin’s torso in May behind a Montreal apartment where Magnotta lived. Police say Magnotta mailed other parts of Lin’s body to Canadian politicians in Ottawa and to two schools in Vancouver.

Investigators say Magnotta, 29, fled to France and then Germany after the killing, which they believe happened on May 24 or May 25. Magnotta was arrested at a Berlin Internet cafe while browsing articles about himself; He was later extradited to Canada.

Lin, 33, was a student at Montreal’s Concordia University. His family traveled to Canada last month to reclaim their only son’s remains.

Donations from the public helped pay for the family’s travel to Canada, and Concordia University has set up an award in Lin’s name to assist Chinese students.

 

 

The Lake of the Ozarks electricution

Brother, sister electrocuted during lake swim, Missouri authorities say

The Lake of the Ozarks, where two children were electrocuted on Wednesday, near Osage Beach, Missouri, is pictured in 2011.
The Lake of the Ozarks, where two children were electrocuted on Wednesday, near Osage Beach, Missouri, is pictured in 2011.
(CNN) — A 13-year-old girl and her 8-year-old brother were electrocuted Wednesday while they were swimming in the Lake of the Ozarks near Osage Beach, Missouri, authorities said.

The two were swimming near a private dock in the lake when they were killed, according to a press release from the Missouri State Highway Patrol.

“The children screamed when the initial shock hit and when the adults dove in (to attempt rescue) they could feel the electricity in the water,” said Highway Patrol Sgt. Paul Reinsch. Then the adults turned off the electricity to the dock” before pulling the siblings out of the water and attempting CPR, Reinsch said.

The children, who were from Ashland, Missouri, about 60 miles north of the scene of the accident, were taken to Lake Regional Hospital, where they were pronounced dead.

Reinsch told CNN the water was electrified because of “a problem with the wiring going to the dock from the house,” although he stressed that investigators could not pinpoint which of several electrical components on the dock caused the accident.

The Missouri State Highway Patrol Marine Operations Division and the Division of Drug and Crime Control were investigating, and autopsies were planned, authorities said.

Quake shakes Italy leaves 4 dead

New quake rattles Italy after earlier tremor kills 7

From Barbie Nadeau, For CNN
A rescuer walks near the town hall in Sant'Agostino village after a powerful earthquake shook Italy's industrial and densely populated Northeast early on Sunday, May 20.
A rescuer walks near the town hall in Sant’Agostino village after a powerful earthquake shook Italy’s industrial and densely populated Northeast early on Sunday, May 20.

 Quake rocks northern Italy

 Finale Emilia, Italy (CNN) — Northern Italy was shaken by an aftershock Monday morning, a day after a magnitude-6.0 quake killed at least seven people and left thousands of survivors huddling in tents or cars overnight.

Monday morning’s aftershock caused buildings to sway in the town of Finale Emilia, in Italy’s industrial heartland. The tremor had a magnitude of 3.2 and hit near the site of the original quake, according to the Italian Seismic Service.

The head of Italy’s Civil Protection Department, Franco Gabrielli, said 11,000 people had been displaced by the first quake around 4 a.m. (10 p.m. Saturday ET) on Sunday morning.

The government put 3,000 people up in tents or hotels, but could not shelter everyone who was displaced.

Earthquake in Italy: Before and afterEarthquake in Italy: Before and after

At least 7 dead after quake rocks Italy

In Finale Emilia, about 35 kilometers (21 miles) north of Bologna, 75 people were sleeping in cars in a public park. One of them was Filomenna Gatti, who planned to cram into a Fiat Punto with her husband and three children under 6.

“I close my eyes and I see stones falling and I feel the ground shaking when it’s still,” Gatti said as she walked her dog. “I don’t want to be in any building.”

Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti was expected to return from the NATO summit in Chicago on Monday.

Monti said Sunday he was leaving the conference early, vowing, “All that is necessary will be done as soon as possible” to help the survivors.

The quake was centered about 4 kilometers outside Camposanto, northwest of Bologna, the U.S. Geological Survey reported. In addition to the seven reported fatalities, 50 people were injured in the quake, Gabrielli said.

iReport: Watch the earthquake aftermath unfold

The stricken region is part of Italy’s industrial heartland, and the dead included two people killed in a ceramics factory in Sant’Agostino di Ferrara, about 30 kilometers from the epicenter, civil protection agency spokeswoman Elisabetta Maffani said.

Workers were still digging through rubble in hopes of finding survivors in Sant’Agostino, where the quake knocked down a church bell and a magnitude-4.8 aftershock brought down part of its city hall Sunday evening.

“We have just lost our history. Four generations of my family lived here, and now it’s gone,” 72-year-old Luciano Frendo said as he walked through Finale Emila. “Our history has collapsed.”

The civil protection agency said it expects to get more reports of injuries as rescue workers make their way to remote villages in the mountainous area. Heavy rain was expected to continue into Tuesday after hampering rescue efforts and efforts to spot survivors from the air.

Other deaths included one person killed when a work shed collapsed in nearby Ponte Rodoni di Bondeno, Maffani said. In addition, a woman in Bologna died of a heart attack during an evacuation, a Moroccan national died when the factory he was working in collapsed and a sixth victim was found dead under rubble in Sant’Agostino, she said.

The body of a seventh victim was located under a collapsed house, according to Alessio Bellodi of the civil protection branch in Bologna.

The same area was struck by a 5.3-magnitude quake in January. And a 6.3-magnitude earthquake struck near the central Italian city of L’Aquila, more than 400 km to the south, in 2009, killing more than 300 and causing widespread destruction.

Planes collide in Canada

Five killed in collision of two small planes over Canada

By the CNN Wire Staff

(CNN) — Five people were killed Saturday when two small planes collided in the air northeast of Saskatoon, Canada, officials said.

Both planes involved were single-engine aircraft.

One was en route to La Ronge from Regina with a man and woman aboard, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police said.

The other was traveling to St. Brieux, Saskatchewan, where the crash occurred, from Calgary. Two men and a male juvenile were aboard, police said.

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada is investigating the crash.

49 decapitated bodies found in Mexico

49 decapitated bodies found in Mexico

By the CNN Wire Staff
May 14, 2012 — Updated 1345 GMT (2145 HKT)

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Gruesome discovery along a Mexican highway
Monterrey, Mexico (CNN) — Mexican authorities found at least 49 decapitated and dismembered bodies along a highway in a northern border state Sunday morning, officials said.

The remains were left along the road in Nuevo Leon state, between the cities of Monterrey and Reynosa.

A message written on a wall nearby appeared to refer to the Zetas drug cartel.

“This continues to be violence between criminal groups. This is not an attack against the civilian population,” said Jorge Domene, Nuevo Leon’s state security spokesman.

He said it appeared as though the victims were killed a day or two ago, somewhere else, and that their bodies were then dropped off.

Officials said they had not ruled out the possibility that the victims could be Central American immigrants or residents of another state, telling reporters Sunday that there had not been many local missing persons reports in recent days.

But the area has become a battleground for a brutal conflict between the Zetas and the Gulf cartel, and reports of forced disappearances have become increasingly common in recent years.

 Police and troops were combing the area and set up checkpoints after authorities received a report of the remains around 3 a.m. Sunday, police said.

The remains were found in the municipality of Cadereyta Jimenez, near the industrial city of Monterrey and about 80 miles southwest of the U.S. border, police said.

The middle-class, industrial community where the remains were found is known for a broom factory, an oil refinery and its historic role as one of the first places baseball was played in Mexico.

Last week, a retired military general arrived to take over the city’s depleted police force.

At least five municipal employees were slain there last month, the state-run Notimex news agency reported.

Federal forces have stepped up security in Nuevo Leon and the neighboring state of Tamaulipas since November 2010.

More than 47,000 people have been killed in drug-related violence throughout Mexico since President Felipe Calderon announced a crackdown on cartels in December 2006.

Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas are among the most violent, according to government statistics.

In Monterrey, Nuevo Leon’s capital, nearly 400 deaths in 2011 were connected to organized crime — more than three times the number of people slain in drug-related violence there in 2010.

Among the most high-profile violence in the region was an attack on a casino in Monterrey last August that left 52 people dead. Authorities have said members of the Zetas cartel were behind that attack.

The Zetas started with deserters from the Mexican Army and quickly gained a reputation for ruthless violence as the armed branch of Mexico’s Gulf cartel. The partnership ended in 2010, and turf battles between the rival cartels are common in northern Mexico.

Obama and religious leaders conflict over gay marriage decision

Obama decision conflicts with Black religious leaders

PHOTO: President Obama and Robin Roberts
President Barack Obama participates in an interview with Robin Roberts of ABC News’ “Good Morning America,” in the Cabinet Room of the White House, May 9, 2012. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)
After making his historic remarks on same-sex unions last week, President Barack Obama led a conference call with black church pastors to explain his support for gay marriage, the New York Times reports. The call, which was held with “eight or so African-American ministers,” occurred about two hours after the president’s interview with ABC’s Robin Roberts.

Obama explained to them that he struggled with the decision, pastors on the call told the paper, but several voiced their disapproval.

“They were wrestling with their ability to get over his theological position,” the Rev. Delman Coates, a Maryland pastor who was on the call, told the Times.

The conference call was part of a quiet effort by the president to control potential political damage caused by his support of same-sex marriage.

According to the Times, Obama phoned “at least one [the Rev. Joel C. Hunter] of the five spiritual leaders he calls regularly for religious guidance, and his aides contacted other religious figures who have been supportive in the past.”

Hunter, the pastor of a conservative megachurch, said he wasn’t surprised Obama didn’t ask him advice before the ABC interview because “I would have tried to talk him out of it.”

At services on Sunday, black churches were conflicted about President Obama’s support of gay marriage, according to the USA Today:

Some churches were silent on the issue. At others, pastors spoke against the president’s decision Wednesday–but kindly of the man himself. A few blasted the president and his decision. A minority spoke in favor of the decision and expressed understanding of the president’s change of heart.

Bishop Timothy Clark, head of the First Church of God, a large African-American church with a television ministry in Columbus, Ohio, was perhaps most typical. He felt compelled to address the president’s comments at a Wednesday evening service and again Sunday morning. He was responding to an outpouring of calls, e-mails and text messages from members of his congregation after the president’s remarks.

What did he hear from churchgoers? “No church or group is monolithic. Some were powerfully agitated and disappointed. Others were curious. ‘Why now? To what end?’ Others were hurt. And others, to be honest, told me it’s not an issue and they don’t have a problem with it.”

What did the bishop tell his congregation? He opposes gay marriage. It is not just a social issue, he said, but a religious one for those who follow the Bible. “The spiritual issue is ground in the word of God.” That said, “I believe the statement the president made and his decision was made in good faith. I am sure because the president is a good man. I know his decision was made after much thought and consideration and, I’m sure, even prayer