Trump reaches critical number to clinch nomination

May 26 at 1:17 PM
WASHINGTON — Donald Trump reached the number of delegates needed to clinch the Republican nomination for president Thursday, completing an unlikely rise that has upended the political landscape and set the stage for a bitter fall campaign.The good news for Trump, reported by The Associated Press after a nationwide survey of unbound delegates, was tempered by continuing problems for his campaign. Those include the abrupt departure of Trump’s political director and continuing resistance by many Republican leaders to declare their support for his upstart candidacy.Trump was put over the top in the AP delegate count by a small number of the party’s unbound delegates who told the AP they would support him at the national convention in July. Among them was Oklahoma GOP chairwoman Pam Pollard.

“I think he has touched a part of our electorate that doesn’t like where our country is,” Pollard said. “I have no problem supporting Mr. Trump.”

It takes 1,237 delegates to win the Republican nomination. Trump has reached 1,238. With 303 delegates at stake in five state primaries on June 7, Trump will easily pad his total, avoiding a contested convention in Cleveland.

Speaker Paul Ryan has backed away from his pledge to support whoever becomes the nominee, saying he’s “not ready” to endorse Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. Other GOP heavyweights, including the Bushes, are also not giving endorsements. (Jenny Starrs/The Washington Post)

Trump, a political neophyte who for years delivered caustic commentary on the state of the nation from the sidelines but had never run for office, fought off 16 other Republican contenders in an often ugly primary race.

Many on the right have been slow to warm to Trump, wary of his conservative bona fides. Others worry about his crass personality and the lewd comments he’s made about women.

But millions of grass-roots activists, many of them outsiders to the political process, have embraced him as a plain-speaking populist.

Steve House, chairman of the Colorado Republican Party and an unbound delegate who confirmed his support of Trump to the AP, said he likes the billionaire’s background as a businessman. “Leadership is leadership,” House said. “If he can surround himself with the political talent, I think he will be fine.”

May 26 at 1:17 PM
WASHINGTON — Donald Trump reached the number of delegates needed to clinch the Republican nomination for president Thursday, completing an unlikely rise that has upended the political landscape and set the stage for a bitter fall campaign.The good news for Trump, reported by The Associated Press after a nationwide survey of unbound delegates, was tempered by continuing problems for his campaign. Those include the abrupt departure of Trump’s political director and continuing resistance by many Republican leaders to declare their support for his upstart candidacy.Trump was put over the top in the AP delegate count by a small number of the party’s unbound delegates who told the AP they would support him at the national convention in July. Among them was Oklahoma GOP chairwoman Pam Pollard.

“I think he has touched a part of our electorate that doesn’t like where our country is,” Pollard said. “I have no problem supporting Mr. Trump.”

It takes 1,237 delegates to win the Republican nomination. Trump has reached 1,238. With 303 delegates at stake in five state primaries on June 7, Trump will easily pad his total, avoiding a contested convention in Cleveland.

GOP establishment splits over supporting Trump

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Speaker Paul Ryan has backed away from his pledge to support whoever becomes the nominee, saying he’s “not ready” to endorse Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. Other GOP heavyweights, including the Bushes, are also not giving endorsements. (Jenny Starrs/The Washington Post)

Trump, a political neophyte who for years delivered caustic commentary on the state of the nation from the sidelines but had never run for office, fought off 16 other Republican contenders in an often ugly primary race.

Many on the right have been slow to warm to Trump, wary of his conservative bona fides. Others worry about his crass personality and the lewd comments he’s made about women.

But millions of grass-roots activists, many of them outsiders to the political process, have embraced him as a plain-speaking populist.

Steve House, chairman of the Colorado Republican Party and an unbound delegate who confirmed his support of Trump to the AP, said he likes the billionaire’s background as a businessman.

“Leadership is leadership,” House said. “If he can surround himself with the political talent, I think he will be fine.”

Replay

 

Trump’s pivotal moment comes amid a new sign of internal problems.

Hours before clinching the nomination, he announced the abrupt departure of political director Rick Wiley, who was in the midst of leading the campaign’s push to hire staff in key battleground states. In a statement, Trump’s campaign said Wiley had been hired only until the candidate’s organization “was running full steam.”

Poll: Most voters see Trump and Clinton unfavorably

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Here’s what a Washington Post/ABC News poll conducted May 16-19, 2016 said about the race between Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton and GOP candidate Donald Trump. (Sarah Parnass/The Washington Post)

His hiring about six weeks ago was seen as a sign that party veterans were embracing Trump’s campaign. But a person familiar with Wiley’s ouster said the operative clashed with others in Trump’s operation and didn’t want to put longtime Trump allies in key jobs. The person insisted on anonymity because the person was not authorized to publicly discuss the internal campaign dynamics.

Some delegates who confirmed their decisions to back Trump were tepid at best.

Cameron Linton of Pittsburgh said he will back Trump on the first ballot since he won the presidential primary vote in Linton’s congressional district.

“If there’s a second ballot I won’t vote for Donald Trump,” Linton said. “He’s ridiculous. There’s no other way to say it.”

Trump’s path to the Republican presidential nomination began with an escalator ride.

Trump and his wife, Melania, descended an escalator into the basement lobby of the Trump Tower on June 16, 2015, for an announcement many observers had said would never come: The celebrity real estate developer had flirted with running for office in the past.

His speech then set the tone for his ability to dominate the headlines with provocative statements, insults and hyperbole. He called Mexicans “rapists,” promised to build a wall between the U.S. and Mexico and proposed banning most Muslims from the U.S. for an indeterminate time.

He criticized women for their looks. And he unleashed an uncanny marketing ability in which he deduced his critics’ weak points and distilled them to nicknames that stuck. “Little Marco” Rubio, “Weak” Jeb Bush and “Lyin’ Ted” Cruz, among others, all were forced into reacting to Trump. They fell one-by-one — leaving Trump the sole survivor of a riotous Republican primary.

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His rallies became magnets for free publicity. Onstage, he dispensed populism that drew thousands of supporters, many wearing his trademark “Make America Great Again” hats and chanting, “Build the wall!”

The events drew protests too— with demonstrators sometimes forcibly ejected.

When voting started, Trump was not so fast out of the gate.

He lost the Iowa caucuses in February, falling behind Cruz and barely edging Rubio for second. He recovered in New Hampshire. From there he and Cruz fiercely engaged, with Trump winning some and losing some but one way or another dominating the rest of the primary season — in votes or at least in attention — and ultimately in delegates.

He incurred relatively low campaign costs — just $57 million through the end of April. He covered most of it with at least $43 million of his own money loaned to the campaign.

Trump entered a new phase of his campaign Tuesday night by holding his first major campaign fundraiser: a $25,000-per-ticket dinner in Los Angeles.

Trump, 69, the son of a New York City real estate magnate, had risen to fame in the 1980s and 1990s, overseeing major real estate deals, watching his financial fortunes rise, then fall, hosting “The Apprentice” TV show and authoring more than a dozen books.

___

Associated Press writers James Nord in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Marc Levy in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, James MacPherson in Bismarck, North Dakota, Jill Colvin in Anaheim, California, Steve Peoples in Washington and Sean Murphy in Oklahoma City contributed to this report.

Hours before clinching the nomination, he announced the abrupt departure of political director Rick Wiley, who was in the midst of leading the campaign’s push to hire staff in key battleground states. In a statement, Trump’s campaign said Wiley had been hired only until the candidate’s organization “was running full steam.”

Here’s what a Washington Post/ABC News poll conducted May 16-19, 2016 said about the race between Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton and GOP candidate Donald Trump. (Sarah Parnass/The Washington Post)

His hiring about six weeks ago was seen as a sign that party veterans were embracing Trump’s campaign. But a person familiar with Wiley’s ouster said the operative clashed with others in Trump’s operation and didn’t want to put longtime Trump allies in key jobs. The person insisted on anonymity because the person was not authorized to publicly discuss the internal campaign dynamics.

Some delegates who confirmed their decisions to back Trump were tepid at best.

Cameron Linton of Pittsburgh said he will back Trump on the first ballot since he won the presidential primary vote in Linton’s congressional district.

“If there’s a second ballot I won’t vote for Donald Trump,” Linton said. “He’s ridiculous. There’s no other way to say it.”

Trump’s path to the Republican presidential nomination began with an escalator ride.

Trump and his wife, Melania, descended an escalator into the basement lobby of the Trump Tower on June 16, 2015, for an announcement many observers had said would never come: The celebrity real estate developer had flirted with running for office in the past.

His speech then set the tone for his ability to dominate the headlines with provocative statements, insults and hyperbole. He called Mexicans “rapists,” promised to build a wall between the U.S. and Mexico and proposed banning most Muslims from the U.S. for an indeterminate time.

He criticized women for their looks. And he unleashed an uncanny marketing ability in which he deduced his critics’ weak points and distilled them to nicknames that stuck. “Little Marco” Rubio, “Weak” Jeb Bush and “Lyin’ Ted” Cruz, among others, all were forced into reacting to Trump. They fell one-by-one — leaving Trump the sole survivor of a riotous Republican primary.

The Internet of Things (IoT) has the potential to solve our biggest global challenges and bring people everywhere a better quality of life.

 

His rallies became magnets for free publicity. Onstage, he dispensed populism that drew thousands of supporters, many wearing his trademark “Make America Great Again” hats and chanting, “Build the wall!”

The events drew protests too— with demonstrators sometimes forcibly ejected.

When voting started, Trump was not so fast out of the gate.

He lost the Iowa caucuses in February, falling behind Cruz and barely edging Rubio for second. He recovered in New Hampshire. From there he and Cruz fiercely engaged, with Trump winning some and losing some but one way or another dominating the rest of the primary season — in votes or at least in attention — and ultimately in delegates.

He incurred relatively low campaign costs — just $57 million through the end of April. He covered most of it with at least $43 million of his own money loaned to the campaign.

Trump entered a new phase of his campaign Tuesday night by holding his first major campaign fundraiser: a $25,000-per-ticket dinner in Los Angeles.

Trump, 69, the son of a New York City real estate magnate, had risen to fame in the 1980s and 1990s, overseeing major real estate deals, watching his financial fortunes rise, then fall, hosting “The Apprentice” TV show and authoring more than a dozen books.

Associated Press writers James Nord in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Marc Levy in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, James MacPherson in Bismarck, North Dakota, Jill Colvin in Anaheim, California, Steve Peoples in Washington and Sean Murphy in Oklahoma City contributed to this report.

Investigation Looks at Actual Qualifications of Dentists to Extract Teeth

Investigation Looks at Actual Qualifications of Dentists to Extract Teeth

(HEADLINE NEWS guru 5/22/2016) It is important that all the potential risks, benefits, complications and alternative treatment options of tooth removal be reviewed with a patient prior to any surgery.
In the eyes of a dental professional, such as a general dentist or a board certified oral and maxillofacial surgeon, the definition of a “routine procedure” is objective. Most all professionals would argue that there are extractions which are more complicated than others, and this is the area that appears grey.1.
These more complex oral surgical procedures are often performed by non-oral surgeon (general dentist) professionals and yet there are no real stats to determine how many of these cases have a higher post-operative complication rate, versus if the patient would have gone to an oral surgeon.
WebMD recommends that patients research the education and training of their dentist under “recommendations for choosing a dentist.” This makes it appear that for a top visited website such as Web MD, a website that must be rather neutral and apolitical; they put significant weight on this topic’s importance. In fact, it is in their top three suggestions: advising patients to find a qualified professional when it is recommended to have a tooth extracted. WebMD even references the educational institutions from where the dentist graduated.2
So what does this tell us? It appears they are indirectly conveying an associated risk with choosing a professional that does not have the proper training or experience.
So how can patients safeguard and assure their best chance for a successful procedure? Headline News asked the top reviewed oral surgeon in Newport Beach, CA (according to Yelp, Health Grades, Google plus, and a list of other medical review authorities) for his opinion. 3dr_Tom_michaelis
Dr. Thomas R. Michaelis (www.DentalSurgery.guru) stated, “I see a lot of mistakes from general dentists who attempted procedures that were possibly above their training level. Today’s medical field has become so specialized; it is in the best interest of a patient to be treated by a team of dental specialists instead of a single “generalist”. In fact, I reverse refer a lot of my patients back to my team of general dentists for restorative work once surgery has been completed. The general dentists are extremely well trained in these restorative procedures and they are much better at it that I am. Even though I am also a dentist, I know that any patient of mine will be far better off having a general dentist perform their restorative work than me. However, my additional 6 years of medical education and surgical training beyond dental school has helped me perform procedures such as dental implants and wisdom tooth removal at the highest level, with proven success. I mean, if you were told you needed a hip replacement, would you prefer the board certified orthopedic surgeon or the family practioner who went to a weekend course? It’s the same principle. “
Dr. Michaelis went on to tell us that removing teeth, while not a particularly pleasant experience for patients, is a routine and uncomplicated procedure in the hands of a well-trained expert. For most oral surgeons, wisdom tooth removal is the mainstay of their practice and the 4 to 6 years of additional training beyond dental school helps minimize the complication rate and make the procedure as routine as possible.
What keeps a tooth in place in its native bone is a membrane or ligament that surrounds the tooth root called the periodontal ligament (“peri” – around; “odont” – root). The main fibers of the ligament surround the tooth at a slanted angle similar to a hammock and attach it to the bone. By carefully manipulating the tooth and with qualified training, these fibers can be fairly easily dislodged, allowing the tooth to be removed quite simply. Believe it or not, there is a real art and “feel” involved in tooth removal, making it both routine and relatively simple.2
To ensure the extraction is “simple” in the professional sense is not so simple. It involves proper assessment and diagnosis beforehand, in particular of the shape and status of the tooth or teeth to be removed, and the surrounding bone in which they are encased. Routine radiographic (x-ray) examination will allow that determination. In addition, the oral surgeon should also take a thorough medical and drug history, to both ensure that you are healthy enough to undergo this minor surgery, and that you have normal blood clotting and wound healing mechanisms.
Our investigation concurs with WebMD and the seemingly vast amount of other online resources whereas proper homework should be executed prior to choosing a dental professional for complex and noncomplex “routine” procedures. It is also important to realize that oral surgeons have an additional 4 to 6 years of medical education and surgical training compared to a general dentist. This fact is what really separates the specialist from the generalist and the importance of that difference should not be overlooked.
On a final note, it is important to understand that there is only one standard of care for dental surgery. This standard is always established by the specialists in the field. Just because a general dentist has 4-6 fewer years of education and surgical experience than an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, does not mean they are allowed to practice at a lower standard of care. They are held to the same standard as the specialist, but with less training.
1.http://www.deardoctor.com/inside-the-magazine/issue-15/tooth-extractio
2.http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/oral-health-care-providers?page=2n/#sthash.29UHrLQH.dpuf
3. https://dentalsurgery.guru/category/a-patients-advice-for-potential-patients/before-you-make-a-dental-surgery-decision-read-this/
4. W. Jerjes, T. Upile, F. Nhembe, D. Gudka, P. Shah, S. Abbas, E. McCarthy, S. Patel, J. Mahil & C. Hopper. Experience in third molar surgery: an update British Dental Journal 209, E1 (2010)
Published online: 2 July 2010 | doi:10.1038/sj.bdj.2010.581
_____________________________________________________________________Henry Thomas Whittikar – Medical Specialist Journalist
IJR News Assistant Editor in Chief Newport Coast, CA 657-222-7074

Xiaomi is getting into the drone business.

Xiaomi is getting into the drone business. The Chinese manufacturer mostly known for its aggressively priced high-end smartphones today introduced the Mi Drone, a camera-wielding quadcopter that undercuts comparable models from market leader DJI by over $300. Two models will be available: the cheaper one, priced at 2,499 Chinese Yuan (just over $380), will feature a 1080p camera, while the 4K model is 2,999 Yuan ($457).

The ball-shaped camera on the higher-end Mi Drone uses a Sony 12.4-megapixel sensor that can capture video at up to 3,840 x 2,160 at 30 fps and take RAW photos, while On the lower end 1080p model, Xiaomi has packed a 16-megapixel Sony backside illuminated CMOS and a 104-degree wide angle lens. Both feature a detachable gimbal that does 3-axis stabilization and is assisted by an optical flow sensor positioned between the camera and the battery bay on the back.

Xiaomi says the Mi drones will have 27 minutes of flying time on their 5,100 mAh batteries, with a range of of 3 kilometers. Like DJI, Xiaomi will build geofences into its drones to prevent them fromIn terms of design the drone itself looks quite a bit like DJI’s Phantom drones.

There’s a standalone controller with a dedicated button for take off and landing and a built-in smartphone clamp so you can use it as a viewfinder. flying into restricted areas. The drone will automatically return to base when its battery is dying or when it loses contact with the controller.

 

Obama: World leaders ‘rattled’ by Trump

President Barack Obama touched on the rancorous U.S. presidential race at a press conference Thursday from the G-7 summit in Japan, saying that presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump’s statements had his fellow world leaders concerned.

By Euan McKirdy, CNNUpdated 12:17 PM ET, Thu May 26, 2016
“They’re rattled by him and for good reason,” Obama said. “Because a lot of the proposals that he’s made display either ignorance of world affairs or a cavalier attitude or an interest in getting tweets and headlines instead of actually thinking through what is required to keep America safe.”
“They are surprised by (Trump), not sure how to take some of his pronouncements,” the President added.
Obama said the world is watching the campaign.
Opinion: Who in the world really wants Donald Trump to win?
“The world pays attention to U.S. elections,” Obama said. “They pay more attention to our elections sometimes than we pay to theirs. The U.S. is … at the heart of the international order and even those countries that are critical of us…know that ultimately things don’t hold together so well if the U.S. isn’t making good decisions and they count on us to provide stability when making global decisions.”

Slovenia – Melania, the third Mrs. Trump, is from Sevnica. Some locals are hopeful a Trump win might lead to publicity and additional donations from Melania. (She gave to the local health clinic after the 2006 birth of their son, Barron.)
Indonesia – 2015 saw the announcement of Trump’s first and second properties in Asia, with a resort situated in “the most magnificent location in Bali” and another in Lido Lakes that shall be “the pride of Indonesia.”
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Sweden – This popular Swedish site allows people to give Donald a blast of trump(et). It’s been blown 110,000,000 times and counting.
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Ireland – In 2014, Trump invested $20 million in a property in County Clare — the downside is that it’s collapsing into the sea. His proposal to build what Friends of the Irish Environment termed a “monster sea wall” met with local outrage.

China – Trump-branded clothes that don’t read “Made in Mexico” often say “Made in China.” Trump explained this in 2011 by declaring, “China so manipulates their currency it makes it almost impossible for American companies to compete.”

The Donald Trump travel guide – Donald Trump is truly a man of the world, even if the world doesn’t always see it that way. Click through the gallery to see what we mean.

Scotland – Trump’s development of an Aberdeen golf resort triggered a vicious (and still ongoing) feud with neighbors, who gave their side in the 2011 film “You’ve Been Trumped.”

Czech Republic – Clearly not content with being known just as the birthplace of Ivana, the first Mrs. Trump, the Czech town of Zlin in 2014 staged the country’s largest ever pillow fight.

Scotland – Trump’s development of an Aberdeen golf resort triggered a vicious (and still ongoing) feud with neighbors, who gave their side in the 2011 film “You’ve Been Trumped.”
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Mexico – “When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best,” Trump famously said. “They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.” This fiery Mexico City tribute shows how this statement went down in the country.

Germany – Kallstadt is Trump’s German ancestral home. However, when Deutsche Welle contacted Trump’s distant relations they elicited little more on the record than, “Hopefully this hype will ease up soon.”

Czech Republic – Clearly not content with being known just as the birthplace of Ivana, the first Mrs. Trump, the Czech town of Zlin in 2014 staged the country’s largest ever pillow fight.

People get ‘grumpy’
Asked about the continued divisiveness on display on the Democratic side of the 2016 race, Obama said people get “grumpy” during the primaries, including his own back in 2008, but will ultimately come together and argued that Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders largely agree on the policy front, but differ on tactics.
The President said that and that it’s important to finish the Democratic primary contest in a way that doesn’t leave anyone with ruffled feathers.
“I would urge and have urged, both sides to stick to the issues,” Obama said. “They’re both good people, I know them both well, and I think its’ important to try to end this in a way that leaves both sides feeling proud of what they’ve done.”
He added, “I guarantee you that the eventual nominee sure wishes it were over now. It’s a grind, it’s hard.”The president said he wanted the Democratic primary to “play out, let voters make up their minds.”
Obama also largely deflected questions about Clinton’s use of a private email server, saying he’s addressed the topic previously and the questions would be better put to the campaign.

 

Thursday morning saw the leaders of Japan, the U.S., UK, Italy, Germany, France, Italy and Canada gather in the grounds of the Ise-Jingu shrine, a 2,000-year-old temple in central Japan.
Obama also said he is going to Hiroshima Friday to underscore the “very real risks” of nuclear weapons and the “urgency that we all should have,” he said.
He will become the first U.S. President to visit the Japanese city where the first atomic bomb was dropped.
Obama told reporters that the dropping of the bomb was an “inflection point in modern history” and is something “all of us have had to deal with in one way or another.”

20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama shakes hands with chef Anthony Bourdain in a shopping area of Hanoi on May 24. The President sat down with Bourdain to film a scene for CNN’s “Parts Unknown.”
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
People gather in the rain to watch Obama’s motorcade in Hanoi on May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama meets with members of the Vietnamese Civil Society in Hanoi on May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama delivers remarks at the National Convention Center in Hanoi on May 24. Obama made a forceful case for human rights in Vietnam and called for the “peaceful resolution” of disputes in the South China Sea.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama walks to the left of Thi Kim Ngan, chairwoman of Vietnam’s National Assembly, at the Presidential Palace in Hanoi on Monday, May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama meets with Nguyen Phu Trong, the Vietnamese Communist Party’s general secretary, in Hanoi on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama, with Secretary of State John Kerry and other Cabinet members, attends a meeting with Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc, third from right, on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama gives a toast during a state luncheon hosted by Vietnam’s President in Hanoi on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama holds a news conference with Vietnamese President Tran Dai Quang on May 23. Obama announced the United States is fully lifting the decades-long ban on the sale of military equipment to Vietnam. He said the removal of the ban was part of a deeper defense cooperation with the country and dismissed suggestions it was aimed at countering China’s growing strength in the region.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
The two Presidents listen to their countries’ national anthems during a welcoming ceremony at the Presidential Palace in Hanoi on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
From left: Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, French President François Hollande, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, U.S. President Barack Obama, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, European Council President Donald Tusk and British Prime Minister David Cameron walk past the Kagura-den as they visit Ise Jingu shrine in Ise, Japan, on Thursday, May 26. Obama is visiting Japan and Vietnam during his 10th trip to Asia.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
World leaders join in a ceremony to plant trees at Ise Jingu shrine in Ise, Japan, on May 26. Obama and other major world leaders are in Japan for a Group of Seven, or G7, summit.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
From left: British Prime Minister David Cameron, Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, U.S. President Barack Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau talk together after a group photo session at the G7 summit in Shima, Japan, on May 26.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
U.S. President Barack Obama pauses for a translation during a bilateral meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Shima, Japan, on Wednesday, May 25.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama is greeted by U.S. Ambassador to Japan Caroline Kennedy and her husband, Edwin Arthur Schlossberg, at the airport in Tokoname, Japan, on May 25.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama shakes hands after speaking at a town-hall event in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, on May 25.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Vietnamese rapper Suboi raps during the town-hall event, which was for the Young Southeast Asian Leaders Initiative.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama tours through entrepreneur demonstrations in Ho Chi Minh City on Tuesday, May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama pays his respects during a visit to the Jade Pagoda in Ho Chi Minh City on May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama waves to locals during a visit to a shopping district in Hanoi, Vietnam, on May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama shakes hands with chef Anthony Bourdain in a shopping area of Hanoi on May 24. The President sat down with Bourdain to film a scene for CNN’s “Parts Unknown.”
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
People gather in the rain to watch Obama’s motorcade in Hanoi on May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama meets with members of the Vietnamese Civil Society in Hanoi on May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama delivers remarks at the National Convention Center in Hanoi on May 24. Obama made a forceful case for human rights in Vietnam and called for the “peaceful resolution” of disputes in the South China Sea.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama walks to the left of Thi Kim Ngan, chairwoman of Vietnam’s National Assembly, at the Presidential Palace in Hanoi on Monday, May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama meets with Nguyen Phu Trong, the Vietnamese Communist Party’s general secretary, in Hanoi on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama, with Secretary of State John Kerry and other Cabinet members, attends a meeting with Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc, third from right, on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama gives a toast during a state luncheon hosted by Vietnam’s President in Hanoi on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama holds a news conference with Vietnamese President Tran Dai Quang on May 23. Obama announced the United States is fully lifting the decades-long ban on the sale of military equipment to Vietnam. He said the removal of the ban was part of a deeper defense cooperation with the country and dismissed suggestions it was aimed at countering China’s growing strength in the region.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
The two Presidents listen to their countries’ national anthems during a welcoming ceremony at the Presidential Palace in Hanoi on May 23.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
From left: Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, French President François Hollande, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, U.S. President Barack Obama, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, European Council President Donald Tusk and British Prime Minister David Cameron walk past the Kagura-den as they visit Ise Jingu shrine in Ise, Japan, on Thursday, May 26. Obama is visiting Japan and Vietnam during his 10th trip to Asia.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
World leaders join in a ceremony to plant trees at Ise Jingu shrine in Ise, Japan, on May 26. Obama and other major world leaders are in Japan for a Group of Seven, or G7, summit.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
From left: British Prime Minister David Cameron, Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, U.S. President Barack Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau talk together after a group photo session at the G7 summit in Shima, Japan, on May 26.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
U.S. President Barack Obama pauses for a translation during a bilateral meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Shima, Japan, on Wednesday, May 25.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama is greeted by U.S. Ambassador to Japan Caroline Kennedy and her husband, Edwin Arthur Schlossberg, at the airport in Tokoname, Japan, on May 25.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama shakes hands after speaking at a town-hall event in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, on May 25.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Vietnamese rapper Suboi raps during the town-hall event, which was for the Young Southeast Asian Leaders Initiative.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama tours through entrepreneur demonstrations in Ho Chi Minh City on Tuesday, May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama pays his respects during a visit to the Jade Pagoda in Ho Chi Minh City on May 24.
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20 photos: Obama visits Vietnam, Japan
Obama waves to locals during a visit to a shopping district in Hanoi, Vietnam, on May 24.
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He added that the “backdrop of a nuclear event remains something that, I think, presses on the back of our imaginations.”
Obama also remarked on importance of reducing nuclear weapons and the progress made in that arena, citing the Iran deal.
Obama said that nuclear proliferation, particularly from North Korea, remained a major concern.
“Obviously ISIL using rifles, crude bombs, could kill a lot of people in a Paris or a Brussels and people are rightly insisting the world community stamp out ISIL and there is a reason why were focused on that,” he said, using another acronym for the terror group.

Obama and Vietnam’s ‘Queen of Hip Hop’ 01:58
But, he added: “We can’t focus on the short term … when you have a regime (in North Korea) that is so isolated and flouts international rules, devotes national resources hell bent on getting nuclear weapons.”
Obama said the G-7 meetings so far had been “extremely productive.”
“For us to (be able to) get together and focus on critical issues … is vitally important,” he said.
He said the meetings had focused on trade and issues facing the global economy, and how the group could work to accelerate growth and “put people back to work,” and the importance of stepping back from protectionist policies that leave countries collectively weaker.

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